notgeldman

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  • in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #51968
    notgeldman
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    I have just added the very interesting verkehrsausgaben notgeld piece, issued in Niederlahnstein and dated 1917……to the notgeld website shop. It has a very interesting story and graphic behind it. :good: if you don’t already have it in your collection, I would suggest that it is a very good addition to have.

    in reply to: Identification #51967
    notgeldman
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    Great work John! – many thanks! :good:

    in reply to: Identification #51953
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hey Jack,

    the text is certainly unclear, and the lower-case letter k is particulalry splodged, but the third signatory on the Eisenach notes rejoices in the titles Stadtrat u. wirkl. Geh. Rat i.e. Stadtrat und wirklicher Geheimer Rat in an unabbreviated form.  In English, that’s “Town Councillor and Senior Privy Councillor”.  The latter title dates back to before the German Revolution, and was a title awarded for life to top-echelon civil servants of  German principalities, in this case the Grand Duchy of Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach.

    The Privy Councillor title is still used here in the UK, but there’s no real English-language equivalent to the part of the German honorific wirklich, which means “true” or “actual” or “genuine”, so I’ve chosen to translate it as “senior”.

    The old German rules for use of the title were (my translation) : “Members of the Privy Council enjoyed titles such as Wirklicher Geheimer Rat or Geheimrat. In the 19th century the honorific lost some of its exclusivity and became a non-academic title for senior civil servants, for example “First Senior Privy Councillor” (Erster Wirklicher Geheimrat), “Senior Privy Councillor and Ministerial Director” (Wirklicher Geheimrat und Ministerialdirektor), “Privy Councillor to the Government” (Geheimer Regierungsrat) or “Privy Councillor to the Treasury” (Geheimer Rechnungsrat).” (source : Meyers Großes Conversations-Lexikon)

    The text in the middle of the Wolfram von Eschenbach note is actually in Middle High German from the beginning of the 13th century, and is from the beginning of Wolfram’s other great epic, Willehalm, where the author claims that whatever one might find written in his books, it is not a result of his ability or art but by the guidance of the Holy Spirit.  He claims here, modestly  : “swaz an den buochen stet geschriben / des bin ich künstelos beliben” (“What one finds here written in the books, is, my goodness, none art of mine”).

    Hope that this helps!

    Best wishes as always :)

     

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #51949
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

     

    For series 320.2a of Eisenach there is a single line of text that this series that I do not quite get.  It is on each of the notes, so I shall list it once.

    Series 320.2a, Wartburgfeier

     

    Stadtrat u. Miroi. Gen. Rat

    (translated 20 April 2021)

    City Council and Miroi. Gen. Council

    <<???>>

     

    The next text comes from series 320.4a, Minnesanger.  Or should I say, the text I could not understand.  For this note, I put the obverse text I could understand.

     

    25 pfennig, Wolfram von Eschenbach, 01 Apr 1922

    Writing on the front:

    Herr Wolfram v. Eschenbach

    (translated 27 April 2021)

    Herr Wolfram v. Eschenbach

     

    <<<<texts I cannot read>>>>

     

    Dichtete auf der Wartburg den Parsival

    (translated 27 April 2021)

    He wrote Parsival at the Wartburg

     

    And on the back is that phrase that confused me from the other series.

    Stadtrat u. Miroi. Gen. Rat

    (translated 20 April 2021)

    City Council and Miroi. Gen. Council

    <<???>>

     

    I cannot offer any guess on the text on the second series.  For the first one, I have to hope that I misunderstood something and that ‘Miroi’.  Thanks for what you can advise.

     

    Jack

     

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #51818
    notgeldman
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    ‘REVALUED GEMS – Volume 2 (L – Z)’ has now been published and is avalable to purchase from the ‘My Books’ section on the homepage.

    There is a link that will direct you to all my books in ‘LuLu’ the online ‘print on demand’ printer and publisher. Thanks in advance for any purchases you make.  :good:

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #51749
    notgeldman
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    At the bottom of my list of notgeld printing companies, is a further list of locations that issued notged printed by ‘Gebr. Jaenecke, Hannover‘.

    Please let me know if you come across any I have missed and I will of course add them in. I guess it will just be a matter of stumbling upon them or going through your collections / scan folders, to find them all.

    Thanks in advance……. :good:

    in reply to: Identification #51557
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    The comment about the eggs and the chicks on the Dülmen 1-Mark note sounds proverbial, but is actually a specific quotation from the mayor in repsonse to an impossible ultimatum.

    In November of 1622, in the early years of the Thirty Years’ War, Prince Bishop Ernst of Münster ordered the town to allow troops of the Catholic League to be given quarters there; the town refused but was forced to open its gates by the Imperial Army in February 1623.

    As punishment for disobedience, the town councillors were arrested and their possessions and property confiscated; the town also lost its privileges.  It is in this context that we see on the obverse a group of soldiers manhandling a prisoner (perhaps one of the councillors, stripped of his finery), while an officer asks “What is to happen with the prisoner?” (Was soll mit dem Gefangenen geschehen?)  The prisoner might even be one of the town’s two mayors, Borgermester (in High German, Bürgermeister) Krumtunger, who is quoted on the reverse : „Schlot de Eier in de Pann’, dann kümmet do nich Küken van!”

    From the date of 20th December 1622 on the reverse, we can take this as his reply to the Prince-Bishop’s order, complaining that the quartering of troops would impoverish the town and thus disadvantage the Prince-Bishop himself in terms of taxes.

    The town, like most of Germany, did not fare well during the apocalyptic war;  its experience included the particular horrors of the year 1635 in which it changed hands no fewer than 20 times.

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #51307
    notgeldman
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    As the info in the printer list is populated that list starts to become more clear. I have worked through just under 50% of what I aim to do now. I will continue over the next few weeks to build thej core listing and then add to it as and when………. :good:

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #51038
    notgeldman
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    Today, I am very slowly starting to create a list of notgeld printers. I have just uploaded an ‘Intro’ and then the start of a basic list. Please don’t contact me as yet as I obviously need to populate the list. Once it gets to about 100, I think it will then be worth any further suggestions. I am trying to clarify the situation with notgeld printers and the ‘non-Reichsdruckerei’ banknote printers.

    in reply to: Identification #51013
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    As I review the notes on Dulmen, I have to wonder if we have one of those phrases that are local is ‘If you break the eggs into the pan, you won’t get chicks coming out!’

    in reply to: Identification #50994
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    There is indeed a plethora of local German dialects, and, to make things more fun, sub-dialects.   The Serienscheine, as collectors’ issues, were a particular platform to showcase local pride in the form of costumes and customs, history and geography, flora and fauna, architecture and natural features, local institutions and indeed one’s own dialect.  This is still a feature of local pride today, if one looks at tourist websites and visits local beer and wine festivals (definitely recommended).  There’s a whole industry of dialect poets and writers and my own library contains a collection of books and poems (and even a version of the Bible) in the dialect of German I first learned, Pfälzisch.

    Collectors specialising in Notgeld of a particular region (e.g. Thuringia, Bavaria) would like as not be speakers of or at least well-acquainted with the dialect.  Collectors from further afield would know doubt enjoy puzzling out dialect terms (there’s a lot of de-coding and deciphering in Notgeld collecting, even of pictures or images, which is part of the fun).  Holidaymakers bringing home Notgeld as souvenirs (e.g. from the Baltic or the North Sea resorts) would probably ask hosts and hoteliers.

    But the fact remains that native German speakers (of whom I’m not one) would be very attuned to dialects not their own; it’s very often a case of transposing vowels sounds or consonant clusters. My German friends can often caricature other German accents, just as I can do passable imitations of other British accents beyond my local East London one.

    As a native English speaker who’s spent a lot of time in Germany south of the River Main, I can usually pick up southern dialects of German reasonably quickly.  I don’t have any affinity with or experience of Low German dialects or Eastern ones, except for what I’ve picked up through a study of Notgeld, and I must admit that I often struggle. Sometimes I have to brood over words or phrases for about a good week or more and spend ages on internet searches.  So not just a few minutes … but thanks for the compliment!

    I think your point about in-jokes is a very valid one. There are some notes which are so specific to a particular time and place that 100 years later we have little clue, e.g. especially if a local worthy lost to history is being caricatured, or a lost piece of local folklore is being referenced.  I’m thinking particularly about notes from communities which were once German and are now in Poland or even Russia, where the old populations were forcibly relocated and dispersed; about buildings immolated by Allied bombing and Soviet artillery; about records destroyed and memories faded.

    I think that Notgeld with a more national rather than local message, particularly political ones, are most likely to be found in standard German.  And even if purchasers and collectors weren’t 100% sure of every word or turn of phrase, it may well have been the pictures which were the selling point.

    As for the Eisbergen notes, which are most definitely in a version of Low German (of which there are many), they translate as :

    25 Pf A

    “Here in this valley of the Weser the Battle of Idistaviso took place. / There did our Hermann the German give the Romans a good whack on their waistcoats.”

    50 Pf B

    “Our church has stood for over a thousand years, The tower is really crooked, / But it still points upwards / Where God lives, and he likes it like that.”

    50 Pf C

    “Here in this room we pray to God / That he might help us out of great misery.”

    1 Mk D

    “In one corner of Westphalia, where the village of Eisbergen is situated, they never let their spirits sink, and if they ever do then there’ll be a lively eight-person set dance to set it right.”

    An interesting point of perhaps misplaced local pride is the drubbing that the 25-Pfennig note insists the German war-chief Arminius (Hermann) gave to the Romans at the Battle on the River Weser (Battle of Idistaviso) in 16 AD; the Romans under Germanicus in fact defeated the German forces, and Hermann was wounded. Just sayin’.

    The word that gave me the most headaches is on the 1-Mark note : “Achtturgen”.  I eventually searched for it in using a number of possible High German spellings and in the context of the picture, showing a dance, and found it to mean a particular North German dance for four couples.  Live and learn.

    The two words on the front are in standard German, although the second one is perhaps archaic.  The Vorsteher is the Chairman of the issuing bank and the Rendant is its Chief Accounting Officer.

    Hope that this is of ineterest.

    Best wishes as always

     

    in reply to: Identification #50991
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

    Today we look at Eisbergen an der Weser.  Like quite a few series, this group has a historical theme.  I cannot say how much is dialect confusion, or just some bad transcription?

    And I begin to wonder how many hundreds of dialects I can expect to find in German Notgeld?

    Now, I know that based on the circulated state of many notes, I believe there was circulation beyond the collector’s markets.  I also know this is a minority view.  Still, I must ask what were the collectors going to do if they could not read that local dialect?  Where all collectors then were like John, where after looking for a few minutes they know as much as the people who designed that Notgeld note?  Was this language an inside joke of some kind?  People buy this but they have no real idea what they have?  What value can any message of pride or politics, or anything have if it does not spread?  How can it really spread if few people beyond the locals understands it?

    <><><><><><>

    25 Pfennig, Battle of Idistaviso, 01 Juli 1921, A 08845

    Writing on the front:

    Hier in dürfen Miasadaule

    Was däi Idistaviso Schlacht

    Dou schleug iufe Hermann däi Germaune

    Däin Römern düchtig wat uppt Baft

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Here in Miasadaule are allowed

    What the Idistaviso battle

    Dou threw Hermann the Germaune

    Däin Romans thick wat uppt Baft

    <<???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Der Vorsteher

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Headmaster

    <<???>>

     

    Der Rendant

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Der Rendant

    <<???>>

     

    50 Pfennig, Johannis der Täufer-Kirche, 01 Juli 1921, B 13342

    Writing on the front:

    Oaba diusent Johr staht iuse Kerke,

    dai Teoan es recht scheif;

    Doch weiset hei neo na boaben:

    Doa muan Gott, Dain hewmet leif.

    (08 April 2021)

    Oaba diusent Johr staht iuse kerke,

    dai Teoan it really shitty;

    But tell, he neo na boaben:

    Doa muan God, Dain hewmet leif.

    <<???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Der Vorsteher

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Headmaster

    <<???>>

     

    Der Rendant

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Der Rendant

    <<???>>

     

    50 Pfennig, Johannis der Täufer-Kirche interior, Juli 1921, C 09626

    Writing on the front:

    Hier in düssen Riume bea tau Gott,

    datt hei us mag helpen ut greota Neot

    (translated 15 April 2021)

    Here in duss Riume bea tau God,

    datt hei us mag helpen ut greota neot

    <<???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Der Vorsteher

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Headmaster

    <<???>>

     

    Der Rendant

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Der Rendant

    <<???>>

     

    01 Mark, Peasants Dancing, Juli 1921, D 20998

    Writing on the front:

    In dain einen Westfaulentimpen,

    boa mua datt Doap Ahsbagen ligt,

    laut’se nea dain Miut nich sinken,

    funs wenn’t’n bullen Achtturgen gift.

    (translated 15 April 2021)

    In dain a Westphalian imp,

    bao mua dat Soap expenses ligt,

    loudly no dain miut don’t sink,

    funs if’t a bull eight-door gift.

    <<???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Der Vorsteher

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Headmaster

    <<???>>

     

    Der Rendant

    (translated 05 April 2019)

    Der Rendant

    <<???>>

    <><><><><><><><><>

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

     

    in reply to: Identification #50959
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    yes Sorrento and Naples and Capri were crowded and busy! But fortunately we found a couple of little oases of peace and quiet and loved the museums which were new to us.

    The Eckernförde notes, which are indeed in the local version of Low German – there are soooo many versions – translate as :

    50 Pfennig (Sailing Ship) :

    WAT PLAGT JI JU UN QUÄLT JU AF MIT DUSEND LEGE SAKEN IN ECKERNFÖR DAR HEBBT WI’T RUT UT SÜLWER GOLD TO MAKEN

    “Why do you plague and torment yourself with a thousand worries? In Eckernförde we have the ability to turn silver into gold.”

    50 Pfennig (Megalithic Tomb at Goosefeld) :

    WO UNS VADDERN ROHT WO SE SEIT HEBBT UN PLANT DAST IS FÖR UNS EN HILLIG LAND

    “Where our forefathers rest, where they sowed and reaped, that is for us a holy land.”

    1 Mark (Battle of Eckernförde, 5th April 1849)

    AN UNS DÜTSCHEN STRAND WO WI TAGEN SÜND UN BORN HETT KEEN DÄN UN KEEN DÜWEL WEL WAT VERLORN

    “Neither Dane nor devil has any business on our German strand where we were born and first saw the light of day.”

    Best wishes as always and happy collecting!

    in reply to: Identification #50942
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello John,

    Today we address # 306, Eckernfornde.  It is a good series for history lovers.  Or so I presume based on the images.  I think it is Low German.  I am certain it is German my translation program does not know.

     

    50 Pfennig, Sailing Ship, # A 50048, 1921

    Writing on the back:

     

    Wat plagt Ji Ju un quält Ju af mit duzend lege saken in Eckernfor dar hebbt Wi’t Rut Ut Sulwer Gold to Maken

    (translated 01 April 2021)

    What plagues you Ju and torments Ju from with dozen bags in Eckernford, Wi’t Rut Ut Sulwer Gold to Maken

    <<???>>

     

    50 Pfennig, Neolithic Structure, 1921, # B 17065

    Writing on the back:

    Wo uns Vaddern Roht Wo So Seit Hebbt Un Plant Das is For Uns En Hillig Land

    (translated 01 April 2021)

    Where Vaddern Roht Us Where So Since He Is Planning That Is For Us En Hillig Land

    <<??>>

     

    01 Mark, Naval Battle,1921, # C 15177

    Writing on the back:

    An uns dütschen strand wo wi tagen sünd un born hett keen dän un keen düwel wat verlorn

    (translated 05 April 2016)

    At our German beach where wi days outrageously un born hett keen Danish un keen Düwel verlorn wat

    <<???>>

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

     

    in reply to: Identification #50895
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack!

    the Dülmen originals and translations from medieval and Low German as follows :

    Bischof Lodewyc bestätigt in besonderen Ausführungen, was Bischof Otto 1304 bereits kurz angekündigt hatte: „Dat unse Dorp to Dülmen van uns gezat tho eynem Stedikene tho makene”

    Bishop Ludwig confirms in a specific statement that which Bishop Otto had announced shortly before in 1304 : “That our village of Dülmen be made a town by our decree”

    “Schlot de Eier in de Pann’, dann kümmet do nich Küken van!

    Borgermester Krumtunger, 20. December 1622

    “If you break the eggs into the pan, you won’t get chicks coming out!”

    Mayor Krumtunger,
    20th December 1622

    Hope this helps! I’m posting from a train between Sorrento and Ercolano / Herculaneum – am missing my Notgeld collection while here in Italy so this was a welcome diversion.

    Best wishes as always

    in reply to: Identification #50888
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ready for help:

    <><><><><><>

     

    Dulmen

     

    Greetings,

    Thank you.  Again, wise work.

    Today wewill examine Dulmen.  It is series 295.1.  The first note I listed have no clue about.  the second note I think I have, if the system was right about Luxemburgish.

    Thank you for your guidance.

    Jack

    <><><><><><><><>

    50 Pf, Town Charter 1311, # 30505, 01 Dec 1921

    Writing on the front:

    Bischof Lodewyc bestätigt in besonderen Ausführungen, was Bischof Otto 1304 bereits angekündigt hatte: „Dat unge Dorp to Dulmen van uns gezalt tho eynem Steditene tho mafene

    (translated 05 March 2021)

    Bishop Lodewyk confirms in special remarks what Bishop Otto had already announced in 1304: “Dat unge Dorp to Dulmen van uns gezalt tho eynem Steditene tho mafene

    <<??>>

     

    01 M, event on Dulmen 1622, # 26480, 01 Dec 1921

    Writing on the front:

    Schlot de Eier in de Pann de fummet do nich Kufen van!

    Burgermeister Krumtunger, 20 December 1622

    (translated 05 March 2021)

    Put the egg in the pan and do not smoke from it!

    Mayor Krumtunger, 20 December 1622

    <in Luxembourgish>

    <<<my thoughts:>>>

    Put the egg in the pan and do not burn it!

    Mayor Krumtunger, 20 December 1622

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50883
    notgeldman
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    https://notgeld.com/gncc-notgeld-articles/elmshorn-story-of-money/

     

    (As I am adding specific info to the website, I have had to make some small amendments so that all the options still appear when the list dropdowns are expanded.)  :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50882
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The text for all six Ditfurt notes and translations of the same follow :

    1. Es war in jener alten Zeit,  / als die Äbtissin Adelheid / von Ditfurt Steuern noch bekam, / die sie in Form von Eiern nahm.

    It was back in the old days, when Abbess Adelheid of Ditfurt taxed the people, which she taxes she took in the form of eggs.

    2. Die Bauern hatten’s weit zum Schloß, / das war es was sie stets verdroß,/ weshalb sie, wenn sie Eier brachten, / fast immer saure Mienen machten.

    The peasants had a long way to go to the castle, and it was that which annoyed them, which is why they made such sour faces, when they brought the eggs.

    3. Der Schulz sagt zum Gemeinderat, / der zum Beschluß zusammentrat : / Wat sollen wei da Eier dragen?/ Wei nehmen einen Ossenwagen!”

    The reeve said to the town council, when they met to decide a course of action : “Why should we carry the eggs?  We’ll take an ox cart!”

    4. So kam der Steuertag heran. / Ein jeder brachte Eier an. / Voll war der Wagen bis zum Rand, / als manches Schock noch unten stand.

    And so the day came when the tax was due. They all brought their eggs. The cart was filled up to the brim, but scores of eggs had not yet been loaded.

    5. Da sagte eine Bauersfrau : Ach / Kinners, makt die Sache schlau. / Wei treten immer frisch und munter / dä Eier noch en betchen runter.

    Thereupon said a farmer’s wife : “Oh, my little ones,  do this cleverly.  We’ll hop up and tread the eggs down a bit.”

    6. Als einer nun das Werk getan, / lacht alles : “Seht das Geelbein an” / – Und Ditfurts Bauer ist im Land /als “Geelbein” heute noch bekannt.

    Once one of them had done the job, they all laughed : “Look at Old Yellow Legs.” And Ditfurt country folk have been known as “Yellow Legs” ever since.

    It’s a fun origins story of simple country folk doing simple (and daft) country things with the spoken words in Saxon dialect.  And yes, I agree that the colour of the notes is not just a coincidence :).

    Hope this helps!

    Best wishes as always,

    John

    in reply to: Identification #50881
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

     

    Today we look at series 275.2 of Ditfurt.  I only have something of a clue on this one.  According to google translate, ‘Geel’ means ‘yellow’ in Dutch.  And there is a yellowish tone to the note.  Beyond that, all I know is I have number two of six.  Google translated the text, but the text seems odd standing alone.  In this case, does anybody have the text and translations for all six of the series?

     

    Thank you,

    Jack

     

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50870
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Peter,

    the note is from Elmshorn;  Tony has provided images of the whole set, front and back; from the Home page, navigate to Categories > Serienscheine > Specific Towns > (towns) A-L > C-E > * Elmshorn. My translations for the entire set are also there.

    The reverse of the 75-Pfennig note you have translates as : The recent war put us under pressure, it ate up all our gold and silver.- But pressure causes pushback – People will have to help themselves the best they can.  We’re pushing back with the power of the printing press!

    I’ve had to translate a little more freely and a little less tightly than I’d like, because the German relies on the related verbs drucken (“print”) and drücken (“press” / “push” / “apply pressure to”) and their common noun Druck (“printing” or “pressure”).  In English, the translation changes according to the context.  In German it’s a linguistic riff on the two senses of the words.  The last line has the sense of “pushing back” and “printing back” [in reply].

    The wider context of the series is that it’s a “History of Money”, with a wide historical but also ethnographic sweep of currencies and things of value, from the cows of the ancient Germans to the huge money stones of the island of Yap.  Your 75-Pfennig note represents a satirical complaint against the war-driven replacement of gold and silver with the spiralling issue of a plethora of paper money notes.  A perplexed bourgeois couple at the top of the note are swamped by the sheer volume of paper money, as indeed is the traditional guardian of gold and treasure, the dragon, at the bottom : it’s as though Bilbo meets Smaug on a pile of inflationary banknotes (although this predates The Hobbit, it has the same, and older, horde-guarding dragon motif).

    Hope that this helps!

    Best wishes and happy collecting!

    in reply to: Identification #50867
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the note is from “Diez in Nassau”, hence Dietz Nassawisch.  The county of Diez was subsumed by the House of Nassau in the 14th century and was firmly part of the Duchy of Nassau until its annexation by Prussia in 1866, when it became part of the Prussian province of Hessen-Nassau.

    The archaic German verse is a very, very loose translation of the Latin couplet above, which is in turn reliant on Ovid’s maxim half-quoted at the top : Omnia sunt hominum tenui pendentia filo (“All human things hang by a slender thread”), concerning the transience and fragility of all human endeavour. It translates as : “All human things upon this Earth, / All life, possessions and money, / All that we crave so much / Hangs upon a slender thread.”

    Note the almighty hand at the top left-hand side of the note, holding a globe by a thread!

    Hope this helps!

    Best wishes as always

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50863
    Peter Taylor
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    Can anyone tell me anything about this one, please? Where is it from…what does it say/what is the story?
    I’ve been told that it has the snow scene on the other side, and is from Friedrichsbrunn, but the font is so dissimilar, that doesn’t seem right to me.

    Thanks for any help!Notgeld

    in reply to: Identification #50848
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings all,

     

    Today we look at Diez. The notes I am looking at date to 1920.  Several notes have these same mysteries for me.  they appear German, but google translate does not seem to be able to get it just right.

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

     

    Series # unknown, dated to December 1920:

    10 pfg, townscape in the past/text, Dec 1920

    Writing on the front:

    Dietz Naßarvisch

    (translated 28 February 2021)

    Dietz Nassarvisch

    <<?>>

     

    Sill Menschlich ding auf dieser weldt,

    das Leben felßst fampt Sut und Seldt,

    Darnach uns doch so sehr verlangt,

    An einem dünen faden hangt

    (translated 28 February 2021)

    Let human things on this world,

    life fights Sut and Seldt,

    We long for so much

    Hangs on a dune thread

    <<?>>

     

    in reply to: Identification #50841
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The language of the 75-Pfennig note is not only Low German but a medieval form of it;  it translates as “Johann noble lord of Diepholz gave the citizens of Diepholz their town charter in the Year of God’s birth (sic) 1380”. The theology of this claim is fractionally dodgy as the year is 1380 after Christ’s birth, but hey …

    The gentleman in question is Johann III of Diepholz, ruled 1378-1422.  The line died out in 1585.

    The reverse of 50-Pfennig note #1 (Lemförde) is in more modern Low German and reads : Wo et so vele Lumpen gift / Von Dag hier up de Welt / Is et keen Wunner dat man blot / Ut Lumpen makt dat Geld. / Ward doch so männig Lump verehrt / De keenen Pennig gelt an Wert.

    One translation would be : “As there are so many ragged scraps / Around these days in the world / Then it’s no wonder that one just / Uses rags to make the money. / There’s many a raggedy scrap held in great esteem / Which isn’t worth a penny.”

    On one level this seems to be bemoaning the worthlessness of paper money.  Paper was often made from rags;  I’ve just reminded myself how this was done with processes involving drums with revolving spikes called “devils”, caustic soda, lime, “breaking engines”, bleaching agents, “potching engines”, “half stuff”, “beating engines” etc.  I seem to remember having this explained to me at an olde worlde paper mill about 45 years ago and my brain went as numb then as it does now..

    Anyway, the word Lumpen (plural) has a double meaning in German; it can mean rogues or scoundrels or rascals or rapscallions (you get the idea), so the hidden meaning of the poem is : “There are so many scoundrels around in the world, …. There’s many a scoundrel held in great esteem / Who isn’t worth a penny.”

    Sadly, English hasn’t got the same pair of homonyms so it’s difficult to bring out the double meaning in a single translation.

    The 75-Pfennig note # 1 (Church) is also in more modern Low German.  It translates as : “History tells us of the people of the parish that they have their own gallows and execution wheel, and a court that sits between the moor and the heathland, and that they eat buck wheat blossom honey and rye gruel.  Long ago it was different, we used to have it so good, now everything is scarce again, even the rye for the bread.”

    The word in inverted commas in the text, “Kaspeler” (with an additional -e for the dative plural), is a specifically local word for those who attend the church as part of the parish, the Kirchspiel, which Low German dialect renders here as Kaspel, hence Kaspeler = “parishioners.  Thanks to Dr Ulrich Müller for his piece on the church at Barnstorf and this little gem of linguistic information.

    I’ve translated the word Rad by way of explanation as “execution wheel” rather than just “wheel”, as this is one of the three examples of Diepholz having a measure of judicial independence, the other two being the self-explanatory gallows and court, i.e. they could try people and exact fines and impose punishments, including the death penalty.  “Breaking on the wheel” was a particularly ghastly form of execution practised across Germany (although I’ve heard of at least one case in 17th-century France), details of which I don’t think I shall bother forum frequenters with here.  If people are interested they can look it up, preferably not after having eaten.

    I advise that especially because the 75-Pfennig note with the goose and the pig concerns their relative merits as food rather than cuddly farmyard friends.  The Low German translates as :

    “Goose breast is a thing we smoke, / Everyone knows that to be a fine dish, / And also a juicy slice of roast pork / Is nice when it turns out well. / And so we want at all times / To engage enthusiastically /In goose and pig husbandry.”

    Hope that this is of use and interest!

    Best wishes as always :)

    in reply to: Identification #50831
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings John et all;

    Once again, a very informative response by John.

    Today we look at Diepholz.

    75 pfg in series 272.1 involves somebody named Johann and a place named Diepholz.  The rest may be in German.  But it is another dialect of it… I think.

    In fact, I think this dialect, if that is the cause, may well be the issue with 272.3

    Thanks,

    Jack

    <><><><><>

    75 pfg, Johann in 1380, 18 July 1921

    Writing on the front:

    Johann edele here tho Depholt hedde den Borgern tho Depholt de stades recht gegenen na Gades gebort A. 1380.

    (translated 13 November 2020)

    Johann edele here tho Depholt hedde the Borgern tho Depholt de stades right against na Gades born A. 1380

    <<???>>

     

    SERIES 273.3:

    50 pfg, Lemforde, 15 Aug 1921, # 1420

    Writing on the front:

    Wo et so vele Lumpen gifft

    Bondag heir up de Welt

    Is et keen Wunner dat man Blot

    Ut Lumpen Makt dat Geld

    Ward doch so manning Lump verehrt

    De keenen Penning gelt an Wert

    (translated 20 November 2020)

    Where there are so many rags

    Bondag heir up the world

    Is et keen Wunner dat one blot

    Ut rags Makt dat money

    Was such a manning scoundrel worshiped

    De keenen penning is valued

    <<???>>

     

    75 pfg, Kirche, 15 Aug 1921, # 4557

    Writing on the Front:

    Von den Kaspelern vermelet de Geschicht

    Se harrn en eegen Galgen Rad un Gericht

    Dat se binnen Moor un Heidentum heft seeten

    Bokweetenjanhinnerk un Rogenbree eeten

    All langst wor dat anners et gung us so good

    Nu is alls weddr Knapp ok de Roggen ton brod

    (translated 25 November 2020)

    The story is told by the Kaspelern

    They have their own gallows wheel in court

    That they lived within Moor and Heidentum

    Eat buckwheat and rye bread

    All long was that otherwise it went so well for us

    Now all weddr Knapp is ok the Rye tons of bread

    <<???>>

     

    75 pfg, Bauer mit Schwein und Gans, 15 Aug 1921, # 18354

    Writing on the front:

    Gerökert is de Gosebost

    jeder ‚weet ‘ne leckre Kost

    Un ak en saft’ge Sweinebraen

    Is moje wenn he god geraen

    Us op de Gos=un Sweintucht smieten

    (translated 26 November2020)

    Gerökert is de Gosebost

    As everyone knows some delicious food

    Un ak en juicy Sweinebraen

    Is moje when he god got it

    Us op de Gos = to rent a swine towel

    <<???>>

    Text by: J H Wordermann <?>

     

    in reply to: Identification #50779
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The Dessau set is one of my favourites! The notes recall episodes and stories from the life of Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau (1676-1747), known affectionately as der alte Dessauer (the Old Dessauer).  Considered a military genius, he is credited with inventing marching in time to speed up the movement of infantry formations, and the invention of the metal ramrod.  He perfected infantry drill and was known as the “drillmaster of the Prussian army”.  A real character, the prince was given a starring role in a volume of humorous anecdotes by the popular author Karl May.

    Note 1 : The slow infantry march, the Dessauer March or simply “the Old Dessauer”, was first played after the Battle of Cassano on 16th August 1705.

    – Note 2 :  Upon his accession, Prince Leopold married his childhood sweetheart, the court apothecary’s daughter Anna Luise Föhse.

    – Note 3 : At the First Battle of Höchstedt (or Höchstädt) on 20th September 1703, Prince Leopold saved the Imperial army from utter destruction by his spirited rearguard action against the French and Bavarians.

    – Note 4 : The Second Silesian War (1744-45) was part of the War of Austrian Succession (1740-48) and confirmed Prussian control of the Austrian province of Silesia.

    – Note 5 : In the Battle of Kesselsdorf on 15th December 1745, the Prussians under Prince Leopold defeated the joint Saxon and Imperial army under Field Marshal Rutowsky.  The quotation in Note 4 and the prayer in Note 5 are both supposed to have been uttered by the Old Dessauer before this battle.

    – Note 6 :  According to local legend, the prince once asked some market traders in pottery how profitable their day had been.  When they lamented a bad day’s trading, Leopold drove his horse repeatedly through their wares and then told them to go up to the palace where they would be compensated for the breakages, thus ensuring that they turned a good profit.

    Hope this helps! Best wishes as always

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50776
    notgeldman
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    ‘REVALUED GEMS (Volume 1)’ has just been published for anyone who is interested. John and Marcel helped me get this project off the ground and to its completion. It contains ALL the revalued / overprinted serienscheine pieces AND other grossgeld and inflationary notgeld pieces A – K.

    I hope the collectors like it. :bye:

    in reply to: Identification #50760
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello all,

     

    Today we look at Dessau.  It tells a tale across several notes.  I am wondering if anybody can offer the full tale by note.

    Translations are not an issue today.  Understanding the context is.

    Thanks for all the help you can offer.

    in reply to: Identification #50759
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    I have placed here the interesting story of the windmill shown on the Daler notes.

     

    Old Bockmolle

    The windmill at Dybbol is not just a building that has been existent in some form for several centuries.  It has been a souce of pride.  Both in how it supported the locals militarily, and in supporting the locals in a culinary rebellion.  The cakes this windmill helped to produce would become a tradition of rebel cakes in southern Jutland.

    Records have a windmill at this site grinding wheat into flour as early as 1774.  It has been battled by wars and burnt at least twice.  The rebel cakes came about because in 1864 combined forces of the Kingdom of Germany and the Austro Hungarian Empire occupying Southern Jutland.  For whatever reason, the occupying forces would not permit the community centers the locals used to have alcohol licenses.  So cakes went from side items to the centerpieces.  To further the point of not giving up any more than they had to, they used the flour from the local mill.  They were going to stay as unchanged as much as they could.

    Flour and food aside, the windmill at Dybbol had a more memorable impact on Danish history.  To start with, there was a second Schleswig war in 1864.  And windmills were among the tallest of buildings in rural environments.  So it makes sense for the Danish forces to use the high vantage point for military purposes.  In 1864 the was as an observation post, sending signals to the troops in battle.  Sadly, for the Danish Army, the Prussian – Austrian army was better prepared.  Victory went to the invaders and along with it went Southern Jutland.

    It would burn to ruin during the year 1913.

    in reply to: Identification #50758
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Thanks, John, your help is full of wisdom as usual.

    in reply to: Identification #50737
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    it’s actually the Dead Maar rather than the Dead Sea (Totes Meer), a maar being a low-lying volcanic crater usually filled with a lake.  The maar in question is actually the Weinfeld Maar in the volcanic Eifel region, made famous by the slightly obsessive artist Fritz von Wille, who painted it repeatedly with the small chapel of St Martin on the north bank, as seen on the note.  The cemetery surrounding the chapel is still in use, which is where the maar gets its other name,  the Totenmaar or Maar of the Dead.  The note renders the name as the Dead Maar : Am Toten Maar, which is grammatically incorrect.

    The Latin Eifliam nescit qui Dunam ignorat means : “He does not know the Eifel who does not know Daun”.

    Best wishes as always,

    John

    in reply to: Identification #50736
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello all.

    Today we look at Daun.  The dead sea line does translate word wise.  Yet I would have to wonder why the locals would want to advertise a dead sea.  Or at least using that name.  this is a filled volcano who waters are not at all dead.  A biblical reference I am not realizing?  Or just honoring the sea or lake in a dead volcano.

     

    50 pfennig, Am Toten Maar, 20 Feb 1920, #026223

     

    Writing on the front:

    Am Toten meer bei Daun

    (translated 6 March 2014)

    At the Dead Sea near Daun

     

    Eifliam nescit qui dunam ignorat

    (translated 18 March 2014)

    Eifliam not know who does not know Daun.

    <<???>>

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50694
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The Dalhausen text, taken from a plaque recording the founding of Our Lady’s Church in Dalhausen, a site of local pilgrimage, is indeed in Latin, although less of a Latin than Julius Caesar would have recognised.  It’s not Classical Latin but post-Medieval Latin, Church Latin and a bit of German-inflected Greek thrown in.

    There’s also an error in transcription, with unhelpful commas added mid-word;  as is not unusual with Latin on monuments, it also has words running directly from one line into the next, and some words running directly into others without spacing, and some words abbreviated.  So what you can read is this :

    IN HONOREM MAGNÆ / MATRIS VIRGINIS / IMMACULATÆ ECCLE / SIA HÆCEX FUNDA, /MENTO ÆDIFICATA / SUMPTIBUS PRÆNOBI, / LIS ASCETEREY GERDEN / SIS SUBRMA ACPRAENO, / BILI DÑA VICTORIA DORO, / THEADEIUDEN ABBATISSA

    But when one tidies up the Latin, you get this :

    IN HONOREM MAGNÆ MATRIS VIRGINIS IMMACULATÆ ECCLESIA HÆCEX FUNDAMENTO ÆDIFICATA SUMPTIBUS PRÆNOBILIS ASCETEREY GERDENSIS SUB R[O]MA AC PRAENOBILI DÑA VICTORIA DOROTHEA DE IUDEN ABBATISSA

    Which translates in to English as this :

    “In honour of the Great and Immaculate Virgin Mother this building was erected at the expense of the noble abbey of Gehrden under [the Holy See of] Rome and the noble Lady Victoria Dorothea von Juden, [its] abbess.

    Hope this helps!

    Best wishes as always,

    John

    in reply to: Identification #50693
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello all,

    Today we look at Dalhausen in Westphalia.  Some of the text seems to be in Latin, though the conjoined AE characters may be throwing things off.  Latin mixed with another dialect perhaps?

    <><><><><><><><><>

     

    <below is Latin>

    In Honorem Magnae,

    Matris Virginis

    Immaculate Eccle

    Sia Haecex Funda

    Mento Aedificata

    Sumptibus Praenobi

    Lis Ascetery Gerden,

    Sis SubRma AcPraeno,

    Bili Dna, Victoria Doro

    Theade Iuden Abbatissa

    Anno 1718

    (translated 24 October 2020)

    To the greater honor of

    Virgin Mother

    immaculata Church

    Established Sheva Haecex

    The rib chin

    Ex Praenobi

    Us Ascetery Gerden,

    Please SubRma AcPraeno;

    Bili DNA, Victoria Dorus

    Thead iudcum Abbatissa

    in the year 1718

    <???>

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

     

    in reply to: Identification #50585
    notgeldman
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    Great knowledge swapping and sharing – thanks everyone!! :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50559
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    regarding the Daler set, I think your translations from the Danish are pretty spot on.  In  my own translations for my collection, I had the couplet on the reverse  of the notes as “We have long had such a longing and yearning / This year we will farm with gladness and song”.  The word avler does mean “breed” but it also means “cultivate” so I assumed that the rural inhabitants of the small parish of Daler were looking forward to going about their agricultural work with greater joy, now that they had the prospect of being restored to Denmark, having been annexed by Prussia in 1867.

    You’re absolutely right about the reference to the plebiscite.  The first North Schleswig Plebiscite, for Zone I, took place on 10th February 1920 (hence the Vort Ønske er opfyldt  den 10. Februar 1920 : “Our wish was fulfilled on the 10th February 1920”.   The notes were issued on 10th April, so after the votes had been counted and verified by the Treaty Commission and the result of the plebiscite had been announced, but before the transfer of power which was to take place on 15th June – which is why the notes were issued in Pfennigs rather than Øre, as Daler still had another couple of months belonging to Germany.

    Best wishes as always,

    John

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #50464
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello all,

     

    Today we have Daler.  The system seems to think the text is in Danish.  However, some of the translations seem a bit off.  Also there may be some cultural references I am missing.

     

    25 pfg, Windmill, 10 Apr 1920, # 42761

     

    Writing on the front:

    Den gamle Bockmolle i Daler

    Bygget 1770 Nedbrændt 1913

    <above is Danish>

    (translated 27 September, 2014)

    The old Bockmolle in Daler

    Built 1770 Burnt down 1913

     

    Vi har saa ofte saa et i Længsel og Trang

    I dette Aar avler vi med Glade og Sang

    <above is Danish>

    (translated 27 September, 2014)

    We so often have one in longing and longing

    This year we breed with joy and song

    <<breed???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Vort Onske er opfyldt

    Den 10 Februar 1920

    <above is Danish>

    (translated 27 September, 2014)

    Our request is fulfilled

    The February 10, 1920

    >>>does this refer to the Danes wining the plebiscite?

     

    Thanks again,

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50463
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    But what about the poor servant who had to get the donkey back down???

    It is reasonably certain the donkey did not want to go up those stairs in the first place.

    lol

    in reply to: Identification #50448
    notgeldman
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    :wacko: :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50444
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The Coblenz- Neuendorf series is an interesting one, issued against the background of the intended French destruction of the fortress town Koblenz’s system of forts (in the event, only the Feste Kaiser Alexander and small parts of the Fort Großfürst Konstantin were destroyed, and Ehrenbreitstein was entirely spared).  The reverse of the 50-Pfennig note commemorates the glorious dead of the recent Great War with a cenotaph decorated with oak leaves, a Stahlhelm and a bayonet, declaring the town to be Loyal to [the memory of] the Dead (Treu den Toten). It centres on a mash-up of lines 5-12 of verse 10 of Schiller’s 1803 poem Das Siegesfest (The Victory Festival) which celebrates the fallen heroes of the Trojan War.

    The original is : Der für seine Hausaltäre / Kämpfend ein Beschützer fiel – / Krönt den Sieger größre Ehre, / Ehret ihn das schönre Ziel! / Der für seine Hausaltäre / Kämpfend sank, ein Schirm und Hort, / Auch in Feindes Munde fort / Lebt ihm seines Namens Ehre (He who fell as a protector / Fighting for his house’s altars – / Greater honour crowns the victor, / And honours him the finer goal! / He who collapsed as defender and treasure / Fighting for his house’s altars, / The honour of his name lives on / Even in the mouths of his enemies).

    The note has it thus : Wer für seine Hausaltäre / Kämpfend ein Beschirmer fiel – / Krönt den Sieger größ‘re Ehre, / Ehret ihn das schön‘re Ziel! (Whosoever fell as a defender / Fighting for his house’s altars – / Greater honour crowns the victor, / And honours him the finer goal!)

    On the front it has the terms of validity : Dieser Gutschein verliert seine Gültigkeit 3 Monate nach Ausstellung (This note loses its validity three months after the date issued).  The word Ausstellung can mean “exhibition” – and there are notes issued on the occasion of Notgeld exhibitions e.g. at Kahla – but it can also mean “issuing”.

    The reverse of the 75-Pfennig note depicts a well-known address in the Koblenz suburb of Neuendorf, namely Am Ufer 11 (Number 11, On the Riverbank), otherwise known as Das Haus der Nell (The House of the Nell Family).  It has a historic archway (Historisches Tor), depicted here, with an ancient inscription, which can still be seen today : DIESES HAUS UND HOFE SIND FREIJ, WER ES NICHT GLABEN WIL, DER LECC MICH IM ARSCH UND GEHE VORBEIJ (“This house and courtyard are free, whoever doesn’t believe it can kiss my arse and pass on by”).  “Free” in this sense means owned by a free family of proud lineage;  the vulgarism literally invites the unbeliever to “lick me in the arse”, which as a phrase has a certain pedigree in German (it’s what the knight Götz von Berlichingen famously invited the Emperor to do back in the 16th century).

    The picture shows a particular scion of the Nell family, either Major Peter von Nell or Major Christian von Nell, or at any rate the presumed builder of the house in the early 18th century.  The verse claims him to be an amusing man, no doubt because of the inscription he had placed above the archway :  EIN LUSTIGER GESELL, / DAS WAR DER MAJOR NELL, / BIS AUF DEN SÖLLER RITT ER JUST / MIT SEINEM ESEL VOLLER LUST, / DOCH SEINEN BÖSEN NACHBARN SCHIER / VEREHRT ER DIESE INSCHRIFT HIER (“A droll fellow / Was Major Nell, / He rode upon his donkey full of spirit / All the way up to his attic room, / But with this inscription here / He honours his awful neighbours).  In other words, the inscription is an amusing and vulgar way of warning away trespassers who might enter into his courtyard.

    Well might he issue the warning! These days Neuendorf has a bit of a reputation as a problem neighbourhood, a sozialer Brennpunkt as the Germans say.  Only last Christmas the denizens of this troubled area on the north of the Moselle and the west of the Rhine, just above where the rivers meet at the Deutsches Eck, were shooting fireworks at the police. It’s an area beset by gang culture and drugs.

    By the way, like most German towns formerly beginning with the letter C (e.g. Crefeld, Cranichfeld, Cüstrin), Coblenz swapped its initial letter to a K and became  Koblenz during the Weimar period (in this case, on 14th May 1926).

    Hope this is all of interest! Apart perhaps from the suburb of Neuendorf, Koblenz is definitely worth a visit; although I was once troubled in the toilet at McDonald’s there back in 1988 by an unreconstructed type (possibly from Neuendorf), I’ve enjoyed the town a number of times, especially for the “Rhine in Flames” in the summer when boats on the river provide a mobile firework show which is legal, above board and not aimed at the forces of law and order.   Rather unfortunately, the last time I was there I woke up to the realisation that I had caught Covid!  Oops.

    in reply to: Identification #50441
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

    Ello all,

     

    Today we look at Coblenz Neuendorf.  It seems to be another series that honors the dead.  Sadly for those who survived, the Great War would have produced a lot of inspiration for war related notes.  Notes that as often as not would bring to mind the lost.

     

    50 Pfennig, 01 October 1921, war memorial?

    Writing on the front:

    1914 Treu den Toten 1918

    (translated 29 March, 2016)

    1914 Trust the Dead 1918

    <or>

    1914 the Faithful Dead 1918

    (As I have said, my project is to find the message in the money for the person holding the note.  I can see a message being sent with either.  I suspect it is the second, but not absolutely sure)

     

    Wer für seine hausaltäre kämpfend, ein beschirmer, fielkrönt den sieger gröss’re ehre, ehret ihn das schön’re ziel!

    (translated 29 March, 2016)

    Who fight for his house altars, a protector of, was crowned the winner gröss’re honor, it honors the schön’re goal!

    <???>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Dieser gutschein verliert seine Gültigkeit 3 monate nach ausstellung

    (translated 29 March, 2016)

    This voucher is valid until replaced 3 months after exhibition

    <???>

    (another new term to my work.  Was this sold/circulating at an exhibition of some kind?)

     

     

    75 Pfennig, 01 October 1921, historic gate?

    Writing on the front:

    Nachbarn schier verehrt er diese inschrift hier, ein lust iger gesall das war das major nell, bis auf den söller ritt er just mit seinem esel voller lust, doch seinenbösen.

    (translated 29 March, 2016)

    Neighbors seemingly he worshiped this inscription here, a funny gesall that was the major nell until the upper chamber he rode just with his ass full of lust, but his evil.

    <???>

     

     

    Dieses Haus und Hofe ist Frei

    Wer es nicht glaben wilder lecc nich am aschvnd gehevodrbejj

    (translated 29 March, 2016)

    This house and Hope is free

    Those who do not believe it wild LECC nich gehevodrbejj on aschvnd

    <???>

    <also not sure I read the text over the arch correctly>

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

     

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #50440
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Thanks John.

     

    Tony… Oh, it is.   the only way to move any faster is to give up trying to translate the notes myself and just send the text stright to him.

    lol

    forgive me if I still try to put some effort into it. :)

     

    in reply to: Identification #50426
    notgeldman
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    Thanks John!

    Jack – I hope your project is really progressing well now with John’s expert input.

    :yahoo:

    in reply to: Identification #50425
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The six notes tell the story of how the wooden statue of the town’s Roland (see also my earlier post on the Bad Bramstedt notes) was carved in 1656-1658 by the master wood carver of Magdeburg, Gottfried Gigas. It was, sadly, burned by the townspeople for fuel during the harsh post-war winter of 1946-1947.

    In 1976 a sandstone version, based on pictures of its predecessor, replaced the lost Roland.  It has the foreshortened and disproportionate arms of the 17th-century version.

    Here’s are the original texts and translations.

    Picture 1

    Zu drein schritt würdig durch das Tor / Der hochwohlweise Rat hervor.

    The council of the town, most wise / As a trio stepped worthily through the gate /

    Picture 2

    Gemächlich ging er aus zum Wald / Und fand dort eine Eiche bald.

    Nun höre, Meister Holzstecher – Daraus mach‘ einen Roland Er!

    Leisurely the went out to the woods / And soon found an oak tree there.

    Now listen, Master Woodcutter – / Make from it a statue off Roland!

    Picture 3

    Mit Messer, Stichel, Stift und Schlag / Trat Kopf Leib und Fuß zutag.

    Doch für die Arme – mögt verzeihn / Ihr Herren! – ist dieser Stamm zu klein

    With knife, chisel, bradawl and hammer / The head and body and feet appeared.

    But for the arms – forgive me, / My lords! – this tree trunk is too small

    Picture 4

    Sie schritten wieder hin zum Wald / Und fanden auch das Stämmchen bald.

    Nun höre, Meister Holzstecher – / Daraus mach‘ nun die Arme Er!

    They stepped out to the woods once more / And found the little tree trunk soon.

    Now listen, Master Woodcutter – / Make from it now the arms!

    Picture 5

    Ein Schmäuschen gab die Stadt zum Lohn / Doch Roland fehlt – die Proportion!

    The town gave a small banquet as a reward / But Roland lacks – proportion!

    Picture 6

    Wohl hält er treulich seine Wacht, / Nur weint vor Scham er, kommt die Nacht.

    Loyal and well he keeps his watch, / But he weeps for shame, when night falls.

    The last picture of the poor disproportionate Roland with his little arms, coming to life at night, turning his back in shame and weeping into his hands as the moon looks on, is quite touching in a Toy-Story kind of way. You can find a picture of Calbe’s Roland at

    http://www.calbe.de/tourismus-kultur/sehenswertes/der-roland/index.html.

    Hope that this is helpful.

    Best wishes as always.

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #50417
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Thank you.

     

    Any source that has the complete text/ translation of these Caabe notes?

     

    It is interesting.  As much as these are for collectors, it would shock me greatly if nobody tried to use them as currency.  As I understand it, the value of the national currency was dropping quicker than gravity, and notgeld was based on hard currency or asset the issuer had access to.  Then again, a one day fair was a good as any to limit their exposure to any collectors who would not want to lose them.  A guaranteed fundraiser for those that issued them.

    in reply to: Identification #50416
    notgeldman
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    Hi Jack! – I was just thinking out allowed here really – some of the notes that were issued for collector exhibitions would have only been valid for 1 or 2 days……but good little observation with the Calbe notes! :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50402
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello all,

    The information, as always has been useful.  Today we look at Calbe an der Saale.

    This series appears to literally tell a story.  Possibly something about a Roland statue?  Currently I only have two of the notes scanned but prob have more in a few albums I have set a side while I do the first group.

    Incidentally, this is the first series I have encountered that seems to be good for one day only.

     

    <><><><><><><><>

    50 pfg, Bild 2, Group and Woodcutter, 23 Apr 1917, # 81954

    Duplicate: # 87215

    Writing on the front:

    Stadt Calue a.d. Saale

    (translated 07 October 2020)

    Calbe an der Saale

    <Calue is an older word for ‘woods’?>

    >>so ‘woods on the Saale… effectively it seems they named the place ‘

     

    Gemächlich Ginger aus zum Wald

    Und fand dort eine Eiche bald

    Nun höre Meister Holzstecher

    Durans mach einen Roland Er!

    (translated 07 October 2020)

    Leisurely Ginger out to the forest

    And soon found an oak tree there

    Now listen to Master Holzstecher

    Durans make a Roland He!

    <<???>>

    (possibility that ‘Ginger’, ‘Holztecher’ and ‘Durans’ are names with the idea this is an image of them instructing the woodsman/artist to make a Roland statue?)

     

    <><><><><><>

    50 pfg   bild 6,    ?????, 23 Apr 1917, # 162786

    Writing on the front:

     

    Wohl halt treulich seine Wacht,

    Nur weint vor Scham er, kommt die Nacht

    (translated 09 October

    Keep his watch faithfully,

    Only he cries in shame, the night comes

    >>>translation of words, ok.  Seeming to make sense, not so much

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50401
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    Regarding the 25-Pfennig Butzbach note, yes it is indeed in a dialect of German, this time Hessisch  (in English, Hessian), as Butzbach is about 15 miles north of Frankfurt in the Federal State of Hessen.

    The picture shows locals in their traditonal dress, worn on high days and holidays and special occasions.  Such Trachtenfeste (festivals in traditional local costume) are a major draw for outsiders;  we as a family go to a couple of them every summer in Bavaria.  Down there it’s lots of leather trousers, dirndls and hats with goats’ beards, although some villages have Tracht not dissimilar to that shown here, with tricorns and frock coats and bolero jackets and pillbox hats.  So the people looking out of the note at the beholder are issuing an invitation : Wollt’r üüs leawig sih, / Müsst’r uff Boutschbach gih (“If you want to see us in real life, / Then you have to go to Butzbach”).

    Hope this is of interest and assistance!  Best wishes as always.

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50392
    notgeldman
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    Hi David!

    I have now got hold of a copy and am about half way through it. Yes, quite hard going in places but very good ofr understanding of the time and situation and the causes of all the monetary problems, including of course the hyper-inflation. :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50347
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings all.

    Today have the joy of thinking about Butzbach., specifically series 212.1a.

    I am guessing this is yet another Dialect that is somehow German in its way?

    25 pfg, peasants, # 60573, 06 May 1921

    Writing on the front:

     

    Wall’r uus leawig sih Musst‘r uff Boutschbach gih

    (translated 29 September 2020)

    Wall’r uus leawig sih Mustst‘r uff Boutschbach gih

    <<???>>

     

    Thoughts on the front image:

     

    <<Groups of people looking out from the notgeld note as if they were ‘breaking the fourth wall’>>

     

    Thanks again,

    Jack

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #50343
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the quotations you’re looking at on the Bützow notes are in the Mecklenburger Platt dialect and come from one of Fritz Reuter’s works, Ut mine Festungstid (“My Time in Prison”), where the authors narrates amusing autobiographical episodes from his years imprisoned in a Prussian fortress as a political undesirable.

    On the 25 Pfennig : Wat nützt uns de Leiw’, wenn de Nohrung fehlt (What use is love, when we don’t have food) comes from Chapter 24 of the book.

    On the 50 Pfennig note : Uns’ Herrgott helpt blot den, de sick sülwen helpt! (The Lord our God helps only him who helps himself!) is from Chapter 12.

    There is a useful book on the Reutergeld, but it’s in German : Das mecklenburgische Reutergeld von 1921 by Ingrid Möller.  It’s also available as an e-book on Amazon Kindle.

    Best wishes as always,

    John

     

    in reply to: Identification #50342
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

    Thanks John, that was quite an interesting view into the legal systems of Brauchhausen during those times.  Troubling as the justice system may seem to defendants these days, this shows that it was worse before.

    Today we review series 205.1 in Butzow.  It is a reutergeld series.  One of these I am going to try to buy a set of all the reutegeld town issues.  I have to wonder if there is a dedicated book written by and or for reutergeld collectors that covers what quotes the issuer was looking at.

     

    Thanks all,

    Jack

    <><><><><><><>

    25 pfg, Fruit farmer, 28 Feb, 1922

    Writing on the back:

    Mat nutzt uns de Leiw‘ wenn de Nohrung Fehlt

    (translated 26 September, 2020)

    Mat is useful to us when there is no learning

    <<???>>

     

    50 pfg, Townscape, 28 Feb, 1922

    Writing on the back:

    Uns Herrgott helpt blot den die sick sülwen helpt

    (translated 26 September, 2020)

    Lord God help blot that sick sülwen helps

    <<???>>

    in reply to: Identification #50341
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the Bruchhausen notes depicts a court scene of the day of the Heilige Fehme, not the Holy Woman but the Sacred Fehme Court of Bruchhausen; the Fehme or Vehme courts were secret courts or tribunals which were active, principally in Westphalia, during the Middle Ages, although they continued to exist until the introduction of the Napoleonic Code in the first years of the 19th century.  Here are my notes on the scene :

    Against a background of oakleaves, that very German of symbols, a handbill appears to be nailed, in the fashion of the summons to the Fehme court which the accused would find affixed to his door in the dead of night.   Upon it, a short sword is stylised to form the figure 1, and pieces of rope to form the word Mark.  The main image shows a table beneath an oak tree from which a noose is already suspended, the means by which the guilty would be punished, left hanging in a public place as a warning; on the table is a sword, symbolising the right of the court to issue sentences of death.  Also on the table is a book, most likely a bible to administer oaths, and a cross which lends the table the appearance of an altar. The whole scene takes place in a town square, which is perhaps surprisingly public for a supposedly secret court;  the Fehme courts are popularly believed to have been convened at night time.

    In this case, the secrecy is maintained by the judges wearing black gowns and black hoods; the figure on the left is seen side on, and we can see that the hood stretches all the way down his back. Traditionally there were, as here, seven lay judges or Freischöffen, the leader of whom was known as the chairman or Stuhlherr.  The eighth man in black, taller, muscular, dressed in figure-hugging doublet, breeches and hose, and standing menacingly behind the bound prisoner, is surely the executioner.

    A picture from the 1375 Herforder Rechtsbuch (“Book of Law” of Herford, also in Westphalia) shows a Fehme court in session, with features recognisable on the notes – the sword on the table, the reliquary with a cross on top for administering oaths, even the long hoods of the lay judges.  The secrecy of the gathering does not appear to be of paramount importance here, perhaps because it is a closed session.

    In the 1920s, murders of political opponents by the Far Right, particularly by the secret Organisation Consul and its successors, were called Fehmemorde (Fehme murders) after the whistle-blowing article and follow-up book (Verschwörer und Fehmemörder – Conspirators and Fehme Murderers) of former member Carl Mertens in 1925.  These included the murders of the head of the Bavarian Socialist republic Kurt Eisner in 1919, of the Communist politician Karl Gareis and the Armistice signatory Matthias Erzberger in 1921, and of Foreign Minister Walter Rathenau in 1922.  Is it perhaps a striking coincidence that the issue of these notes in May of 1921 was followed by the murder of Gareis in June and Erzberger in August?

    Hope this is helpful to you and of interest to GNCC members!

    Best wishes as always!

    in reply to: Identification #50340
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Correction of error to previous post on Brehna series (must be getting old) :

    There are sixteen notes, not twelve.  And the towns on them are : 1. Brehna 2. Bitterfeld 3. Clöden (now Klöden on the Elbe) 4. Elster 5. Herzberg 6. Jessen 7. Kemberg 8.Löbnitz 9. Lochau (now going by the name of Annaburg since the 16th century in fact;  not be confused with the Lochau near Leipzig) 10. Muldenstein 11. Brettin 12. Pouch (pronounced roughly similar to the English word “poke“) 13. Schlieben 14. Schweinitz 15. Wettin and 16. Löben.

    Sorry for any confusion.  And sorry, Tony, if you’ve already set off on an epic journey to find these places with the previous dodgy information …

    in reply to: Identification #50336
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    I guess either i terribly misidentified the note, or we finally found a note I need to paste.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #50335
    notgeldman
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    Here is the 25pf note:

    in reply to: Identification #50241
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Ello,

    Today we look at Bruchhausen.  Specifically, Series 190.1, 01 Mk, Schloss Bruchhausen, 01 May 1921.  Here the front image is a bit dramatic.  If I am to believe my translation of the front image, we are looking at the ‘Holy Woman of Bruchhausen’.  The words translated, yet the scene does not.  This does not seem a scene of great respect.  What am I missing?

     

    Thanks,

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50236
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The Brehna 25-Pfennig pieces all have the coat of arms of the ancient County of Brehna (here in the archaic spelling : Brene), three red hearts inset with trefoils on a silver field, placed back-to-back with the arms of Saxony.  They all read Grafschaft Brene umfaßte (“[The] County of Brehna encompassed”) and each note has a different town or village.  Number 3 is Clöden [on the Elbe]; nowadays it’s spelled as Klöden.  The other towns and villages are : 1. Brehna 2. Bitterfeld 4. Elster 5. Herzberg 6. Jessen 7. Kemberg 8.Löbnitz 9. Lochau 10. Muldenstein 11. Brettin 12. Löben.

    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: Identification #50235
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    John,

    Thank you for all your help with Braunschweig, that town of beer and bread.

     

    Today we address the town of Brehna.

     

    Series 160.2:

    25 Pfg, Bild 3 Lloden, townscape, July 1921

     

    Umfasste: 3. Löden

    (translated 13 September 2020)

    Included: 3. Löden

    <<???>>

     

    Thanks, Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50200
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the other statues you intended to ask after are :

    25 Pfennig : Duke Henry the Lion and his wife Matilda of England (again); here the likenesses are taken not from the old town hall (as on the 50-Pfennig note) but from their tomb in the cathedral.

    75 Pfennig : the figures are from the facade of the town St Andrew’s Church, and represent the Holy Family on the Flight into Egypt, with St Joseph on the left and the Madonna and Christ Child on a donkey on the right.  When I went to Brunswick the church was covered in scaffolding, but fortunately the scaffolding itself was then helpfully covered with a hoarding showing the figures hidden behind it.

    in reply to: Identification #50199
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the translation of Awer de Deigapen backet noch immer!  is in the third paragraph of my reply under 155.1 25 Pfennig Eulenspiegel as a baker; the German text is in the second line, as the final clause of the rendering of the German in italics;  the English translation (“But those pastry monkeys are still baked today!”) is at the end  of the third line and runs into the fourth.  I didn’t think I’d missed anyhting, but I appreciate that there was a lot of text in my post.

    To see a picture of the traditional pastry owls and apes which are still baked in Brunswick today, go to : https://www.braunschweig.de/tourismus/ueber-braunschweig/spezielles/spezi_apen.php.

    I feel that my trip to Brunswick to sample the beer may now involve a sampling of their pastries … not that I need an excuse …

    Best wishes as always,

    John

    in reply to: Identification #50186
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Sorry, could not find a way to edit my prev post:

     

    The statues I referred too where not on a single bulding, but to the statues in the panels of the 25, 50 and 75 pfg notes

     

    thanks

    in reply to: Identification #50177
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    John, great as usual.

    I guess you were already drinking to the memory, as you missed at least one phrase.

     

     

    Amer de Deigapen backet nach immer!

    (translated 30 August 2017)

    Amer de Deigapen bakes after ever!

    <<???>>>

    in reply to: Identification #50176
    notgeldman
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    Super info John – much appreciated!! :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50163
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    Gotta love the Braunschweig notes!  The Eulenspiegel series was one of the first that I collected, and has a special place in my heart; I spent a pleasant day in the town a few years ago, looking out the different locations and statues on the Alt-Braunschweig set, and chatting to the nice people in the town museum who were very helpful.  And 158.1 has one of my fave playwrights, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, so let’s see what we can do to help.

    155.1, 10 Pfennig :

    “Ulenspeigel is nich mid Schanne  / von enem Essel uteschetten / in Knettlingen in usem Lanne / hat Heilebort en in de Weege smetten / Hei was en dönschen Kerl vull Strike / un kam in Mölln tor Erd as Like” (Eulenspiegel was not shamefully shat out by a donkey; / in our very own Kneitlingen he was thrown into the cradle by the stork, / He was a foolish fellow full of tricks / and his body was buried in Mölln).

    155.1, 25 Pfennig (Eulenspiegel as a baker):

    “Statts Lussen dä hei Apen maken / un Ulen un Krein un annere Saken / Blot Pennige kosten sei dortaumalen / Nu most du mer dafor betalen / denn de Tiden sind slimmer / Awer de Deigapen backet noch immer!” (Instead of loaves he made monkeys / and owls and crows and other things. / They used to cost just pennies, / though now you have to pay more for them / for times are harder. / But those pastry monkeys are still baked today!)

    155.1, 50 Pfennig (Eulenspiegel as a lover) :

    “Füer Leiw un Brannewien / de slimmsten Fiend vom Kassenschien. / Doch kannst ohn Sluck un Damp nich sin. / Säuck dick dat schönste Öwel ut / Un nimm ne lüttje säute Brut” (A warm fire, love and strong drink / are the enemies of the pocketbook. / But you can’t live without drink or food / So find yourself the finest vice / and take a sweet young thing as your bride).

    155.1, 75 Pfennig (Eulenspiegel as a doctor) :

    “Nist daun, Slapen, freten, supen, Sachte gahn un pupen Dat sleit an” (Do nothing, sleep, scoff, sup, / walk but slowly and break wind.  That’s the trick).

    155.2, 10 Pfennig :

    BRUNSEWYK DU LEIWE STADT / VOR VEL DUSENT STÄDEN / DEI SAU SCHÖNE MUMME HAT DAR IKK WORST KANN FRETEN (Brunswick you dear town / Ahead of many thousand others / Which has such lovely Mumme beer / Where I can eat sausage)

     

    155.2, 25 Pfennig :

    MUMME SMEKKT NOG MAL SAU FIN  / AS TOKAY UN MOSLER WIN /  SLAKKWORST FÜLLT DEN MAGEN / MUMME SETTET NEYRENTALG (Mumme beer tastes much finer / Than Tokay or Moselle wine / Salami fills the stomach / Mumme builds up kidney fat)

    155.2, 50 Pfennig :

    WENN IKK GNURRE KYVE BRUMM / SLEPE MIKK MIT SORGEN / EY SO GEET MI GUDE MUMM / BET TAUN LECHTEN MORGEN (When I growl or moan or grumble / Or drag my heels in sorrow / O give me good Mumme beer / Until the last day dawns)

    [You asked about the pictures.  The note shows the Altstadtmarkt, the Old Town Market Square, with (l. to r.) St Martin’s church, the market fountain and the old town hall, upon the façade of which are 17 figures of the town’s rulers.  These include the statues of Duke Henry the Lion and Duchess Matilda, as shown here, as well as three emperors, one king and four further dukes along with their wives.]

    155.2, 75 Pfennig :

    MUMME UN EIN STÜMPEL WORST / KANN DEN HUNGER UN DEN DORST / OK DE VENUSGRILLEN / OGENBLIKKLICH STILLEN! (Mumme beer and a sausage sliced / Can still hunger and thirst / And even lovesickness / In but a moment!)

    158.1, obverse of all notes :

    Geld-zetul / ausgegangen bey währender nothzeyt / darinnen all gut geld durch den erschröcklichen krieg ist verschlungen. – Nimbt in diessem 1921 jar für beygesatzten ehrlichen gelds-werth an / des gemeynen volcks bibliotheka und lese-stuben / auff deme Gewandhause / in der stad zu braunschweich (Money notes / are run out in the current time of distress / wherein all good money has been devoured through the terrible war. – Take in this year 1921 for the value of honest money so replaced / of the common people’s library and reading rooms upon the clothing house / in the town of Brunswicke)

    [NB a pseudo-medieval text decrying the financial distress of the post-war period and requesting that the notes be accepted as legal tender. All very tongue-in-cheek] ]

    158.1, 10 Pfennig :

    O, was ist die deutsch Sprak für ein arm Sprak! für ein plump Sprak! (Oh what a poor language is the German language!  What an awkward language!).

    [NB from Lessing’s play Minna von Barnhelm, in broken German, as spoken by the character the Chevalier Riccaut de la Marlinière, Seigneur de Pret-au-val, a pompous French mercenary in Prussian service]

    Hope that this is helpful and informative.  Apart from the pseudo-medieval German and the deliberately broken German, most of the above is in local Eastphalian dialect. Regrettably I didn’t try the Mumme beer when I was there, so I feel another visit coming on!

    in reply to: Identification #50137
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

     

    This time we look at Braunschweig, specifically the Eulenspiegal and Alt Braunschweig series.  Again, I believe these are common enough to be in most collections.  So I will not burn up space hosting them images.

     

    First we will list series 155.1:

     

    10 pfg, Eulenspeigal with Owl, 01 May 1921:

    Eulenspiegel is nict mid Schanne von enem Essel uteschetten in Kneitlingen in usem Lanne hat Heilebort en in de Weege smetten Hel was en donschen Kerl null Strike an Aam in Molln tor Er as Lisse

    (translated 03 September 2020)

    Eulenspiegel is not in the middle of a donkey uteschetten in Kneitlingen in us Lanne has Heilebort en in de Weege smetten Hel was en donschen guy null Strike an Aam in Molln tor Er as Lisse

     

    25 pfg, Eulenspeigal with Monkey, 01 May 1921:

    Ulenspeigel as Backer

    Statts Luffen dä hei Apen maken un Ulen un Kreln un annere Saken Blot Pennige kosten sei dortaumalen.  Nu most du mer dufor betalen denn de Fiden sind glimmer.

    (translated 30 August 2017)

    Ulenspiegel, as in the case of the Apes, and the Kremn and the Saken Blot. Nu most you mer dufor betalen because de Fiden are glimmer.

    <<???>>

     

    Amer de Deigapen backet nach immer!

    (translated 30 August 2017)

    Amer de Deigapen bakes after ever!

    <<???>>>

     

    50 pfg Eulenspeigal Als Liebhaber, 01 May 1921:

    Feur Leiw un Branne Wein de slimmsten Fiend vom Kassenschien doch kannst ohn Sluck und Damp nich sin Sauck schonste Owel ut Un nimm ne luttie saute Brut!

    (translated 03 September 2020)

    Feur Leiw un Branne Wein the worst enemy of the cash register but you can not without sluck and steam are suck suck owel Ut Take no luttie saute brut!

    <<????>>

     

    75 pfg, Eulenspiegal als Arzt, 01 May 1921

    Nist daun slapen freten supen sachte gahn un pupen dat sleit an

    (translated 03 September 2020)

    Nest daun, slap, fry supen, gently gahn and dolls on it

    <<????>>

     

    Series 155.2:

    10 pfg, town view, ‘Appelhans’, 01 May 1921:

    Brunsewyk du Leiwe Stadt vor vel dusent Staden die sau schone mumme hat dar ikk worst kann freten

    (translated 04 September 2020)

    Brunsewyk du Leiwe City in front of vel dusent Staden the sau schone mumme has dar ikk worst can fret

    <<????>>

     

    10 pfg, town view, ‘no printer name’, 01 May 1921

    Brunsewyk du Leiwe Stadt vor vel dusent Staden die sau schone mumme hat dar ikk worst kann freten

    (translated 04 September 2020)

    Brunsewyk du Leiwe City in front of vel dusent Staden the sau schone mumme has dar ikk worst can fret

    <<????>>

     

    25 pfg, alt burgplatz, ‘Vieweg’, 01 May 1921:

    Mumme Smekki Nog Mal Sau Fin As Tokay un Mosler Wynslakkorst Füllt den Magen Mumme Set Tet Neyrent Alg

    (translated 22 August 2017)

    Mumme Smekki Nog Mal Sau Fin As Tokay un Mosler Wynslakkorst Fills the stomach Mum Tet Tet Neyrent Alg

    <<????>>

     

    25 pfg, alt burgplatz, ‘Appelhans’, 01 May 1921:

    Mumme Smekki Nog Mal Sau Fin As Tokay un Mosler Wynslakkorst Füllt den Magen Mumme Set Tet Neyrent Alg

    (translated 22 August 2017)

    Mumme Smekki Nog Mal Sau Fin As Tokay un Mosler Wynslakkorst Fills the stomach Mum Tet Tet Neyrent Alg

    <<????>>

     

    50 pfg, alt stadtmakt, Appelhans’, 01 May 1921:

    Fy so geet mi gude mumm

    Wenn ikk gnurre kyve brumm

    Slepe mikk mit sorgen

    Bei iaun lechten morgen

    (translated 04 September 2020)

    Fy so geet mi gude mumm

    When ikk gnurre kyve hum

    Slepe mikk with worries

    At iaun lechen tomorrow

    <<???>>

     

    Thoughts on the front image:

     

    >>>statue one?

     

    >>>fountain in old marketplatz?

     

    >>>statue two?

     

    75 pfg, wollmarkt, ‘no printer listed’, 01 May 1921

    Mumme un ein stumpel worst kann den hunger un der dorst ok de venusgrillen ogenblikklich stillen!

    (translated 04 September 2020)

    Mumme and a stump worst can satisfy the hunger in the Dorst ok de venusgrillen ogenblikklich!

    <<???>>

     

    Series 158.1a:

    10 pfg, Gotthold Lessing, 1921

    O, roas ist die deutsch Sprak für ein arm Sprak!  Fur ein plump Sprak!

    (Minna von Barnholm)

    (translated 10 September, 2020)

    O, roas is the German language for a poor language! For a clumsy tongue!

    (Minna von Barnholm)

    <<???>>

     

     

    Geld zetus Ausgängen ben mährender notchzent darinnen all gut Geld durch den erschrofflichen Krieg ist verschlungen.  Nimbt im diessem 1921 tar fur bengesatzten ehrlichen geldswerth an des gemennen volcks bibliotheka und lese-stuben auff deme Gemandhause in der stad zu Braunschweich

    (translated 10 September 2020)

    Money zetus exits beneath a morose notchcent all good money from the terrible war is swallowed up. In this 1921 tariff for bengesatzten honest monetary value to the common people library and reading rooms on the Gemandhaus in the city of Braunschweig

    <<???>>

     

    25 pfg, Louis Spohr, 1921:

    Geld zetus Ausgängen ben mährender notchzent darinnen all gut Geld durch den erschrofflichen Krieg ist verschlungen.  Nimbt im diessem 1921 tar fur bengesatzten ehrlichen geldswerth an des gemennen volcks bibliotheka und lese-stuben auff deme Gemandhause in der stad zu Braunschweich

    (translated 10 September 2020)

    Money zetus exits beneath a morose notchcent all good money from the terrible war is swallowed up. In this 1921 tariff for bengesatzten honest monetary value to the common people library and reading rooms on the Gemandhaus in the city of Braunschweig

    <<???>>

     

    50 pfg, Franzt Abt, 1921:

    Geld zetus Ausgängen ben mährender notchzent darinnen all gut Geld durch den erschrofflichen Krieg ist verschlungen.  Nimbt im diessem 1921 tar fur bengesatzten ehrlichen geldswerth an des gemennen volcks bibliotheka und lese-stuben auff deme Gemandhause in der stad zu Braunschweich

    (translated 10 September 2020)

    Money zetus exits beneath a morose notchcent all good money from the terrible war is swallowed up. In this 1921 tariff for bengesatzten honest monetary value to the common people library and reading rooms on the Gemandhaus in the city of Braunschweig

    <<???>>

     

    75 pfg, William Raabe, 1921

     

     

     

    Geld zetul ausgangen ben währender nothzent darinnen all gut geld durch den erschröfflichen krieg ist verschlvngen.  Nimbt in diessem 1921 jar für ben gesatzten ehrsichen geldswerth an des gemeynen volcfs biblotheka und lese – stuben auff deme Gewandhause in der stad zu braunschweich.

    (translated 03 September, 2017)

    Money zetul exhausted nothzent in it all good money through the frröfföfflicher war is verschnng. Nimbt in this 1921 jar for ben gesatzten honorable worth at the common volume biblotheka and reading – rooms on the Gewandhaus in the stad zu braunschweich.

    <<???>>

     

    Thanks again for all thought s and efforts,

     

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #50136
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    John, that was helpful to us all.  thanks.

    in reply to: Identification #50109
    notgeldman
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    teehee….. :good:

    in reply to: Identification #50099
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Oops my Bad (see what I did there?)

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #50090
    Avatar photoDavid Lok
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    • Forum Lieutenant

    Hello –

    I thought that I would recommend a book I just read called When Money Dies by Adam Fergusson. This book deals with the 1919-1924 German Post WWI Hyperinflation and touches on Austria and Hungary as well.

    While it talks about notgeld, this book is NOT a notgeld book. Rather, it is an inciteful work that talks about some of the harsh realities of the era and a lot of the reasons for it. I’ll admit, some of it is dry, especially when dealing with the pure financial aspects of governmental administrative actions, but overall I found it to be quite interesting and a worthwhile read, giving a small glimpse into the era and its impact that notgeld was a necessary part of.

    in reply to: Identification #50089
    notgeldman
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    Hi John – I’m in Germany trying to find Bad Bramstedt from your descriptions……. :yahoo:

    in reply to: Identification #50082
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Small correction to previous post!  I got my Bramstedts mixed up!

    Bad Bramstedt, the issuer of the notes, is not in the District of Cuxhaven as stated but rather in the District of Segeberg in Holstein, a bit further north.  There is a different Bramstedt in the District of Cuxhaven, but not one that is likely to be renowned for its Roland statue or its spa waters and mudbath cures.

    Apologies to both Bramstedts and anyone in the forum confused by my error which I am happy to correct.  I hope that no one has gone to to the wrong Bramstedt in the last week and been disappointed on the basis of my claims :).

    in reply to: Identification #50026
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    Interesting that the search results claim the text to be in Luxembourgish, which is a Germanic language very close to German.  It is in fact in one of the several versions of Low German, in all probability the version known as Hadler Platt, spoken in and around the District of Cuxhaven where Bad Bramstedt is located.

    The obverse of the 25-Pfennig note shows the town’s statue (dating back to 1693) of the hero Roland, a commonplace fountain or marketplace motif in Northern and Central Germany and beyond, as an assertion of municipal rights and freedoms (there’s a great book on these statues by Dietlinde Munzel-Everling, entitled Rolande).  The text reads :

    Uns‘ Roland steiht un kiekt un nöckt.
    He seggt: „De Welt, de is verrückt.
    Ick mag hier nich mehr länger stahn,
    Ick will man leewer rünnergahn.
    Ick gah nah Bielenbarg nu aff,
    Dar legg ik mi ganz still int Graff
    Un slaap dar, bet in Kopp un Hart
    De Minschheit wer‘ vernünftig ward.“

    Our Roland stands and looks and teases,

    He says : “The world is crazy.

    I don’t want to stand up here anymore,

    I rather want to get down.

    I’m going to set off to Bielenberg,

    And I’ll lie down quietly in a grave

    And have a sleep there, while I pray with head and heart

    That humanity will be brought to reason.”

    The statue makes another appearance on the reverse of the 50-Pfennig note, which shows the locals about to perform their tradtional dance around the statue, or rather its wooden predecessor (c. 1533-1694) :

    De Bramstedter Buern danzt an’n drütten Pingsdag 1674 üm den Roland, weil se ehr Freeheit kregen harrn. — Düt ward hüt to Dog noch mackt.

    The Bramstedt farmers dance around the Roland on the third day of the season of Pentecost in 1674, because they got their freedom. – This is still done to this day.

    The accompanying verse is presumably sung while the dance is performed :

    Solang de Wind weiht
    Un de Hahn kreiht,
    Schall um’n Roland danzt warrn
    Wenn de Sünn ünnergeiht!

    As long as the wind blows

    And the cockerel crows

    Around the Roland we shall dance

    As the sun goes down!

    The Roland statue makes a third appearance on the front of the 50-Pfennig note, in the town’s coat of arms. Here the verse details its validity, terms and conditions :

    Düß Schien, de gelt sien föfti Penn.
    Doch eenmal hett dat ock en Enn.
    Denn kannst du lesen in uns‘ Blatt:
    ,De Schiens sünd all nu vör de Katt!“
    Denn bring em gau hen nah de Kass‘,
    Du büß sünst an de Kossen faß.

    This note is worth its fifty pfennigs.

    But that will one day come to an end.

    You can read about it in our newspaper :

    “The Notgeld notes are all worthless now!”

    So bring them to the finance office,

    Otherwise you’ll be responsible for the cost.

    The expression for worthlessness / pointlessness / a waste of time is in German “for the cat”, from the 16th-century fairy story “The Blacksmith and the Cat.”  Here, instead of standard High German für die Katz’, we have the dialect version vör de Katt.

    The reverse of the 25-Pfennig note has, instead of the town’s Roland statue, a picture of its mineral water spring and a dubious four-verse paean to the same :

    Hest du all mal von Bramstedt hört?
    Und von sien brunes Water?
    All mennig een hett dat kureert,
    Keen Water is probater.

    Wenn se hierher kamt ut de Stadt,
    Denn könnt se knapp noch krupen,
    Se sünd nervös un sonst noch wat
    Un hebbt den Kopp voll Rupen.

    Denn plümpert se hier jeden Dag
    In uns‘ oll dreckig Water.
    Slank ward se as en Bohnenschach
    Un bruner as en Tater.

    Un ook de Rupen in den Kopp
    De speelt nie mehr Theater.
    De ganze Minsch, de leewt wer‘ op,
    Blot von dat brune Water.

    Have you ever heard of Bramstedt?

    And of its brownish water?

    It’s cured all kinds of people,

    No water is more effective.

    When they came here to the town.

    They could barely even crawl,

    Their nerves are bad and they’ve other woes

    And their heads are full of buzzing.

    And then they splash here every day

    In our old dirty water,

    They become as slim as a beanpole

    And browner than a Tartar.

    And all the buzzing in their heads

    No longer gives them bother.

    The whole person is brought to health,

    Just from the brownish water.

    The verses were written by the local dialect poet A. Kühl.  As usual I’ve been a little free with translation sometimes,  in order to render meaning better; for example, I’ve translated Rupen in den Kopp as “buzzing in the head”, where the original actually has “caterpillars in the head”.

    Hope this helps and is of interest to forum fans!

    in reply to: Identification #49993
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
    Participant
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    Greetings,

    Today we address Bad Bramstedt.  Series 151.1,

    Weirdly, the computer claims a fair amount of the text is in Luxembourgish.

     

    Series 151.1

    25 pfg, Fountain, 07 Dec 1920

    Writing on the front:

    <poem>

    Heft du mal von Bramstedt hört?

    Un von sien brunes Mater?

    All menning een hett dat fureert,

    Keen Mater is probater.

     

    Menn fe hierher kam ut de Stadt,

    Denn konnt se fnapp noch frupen,

    Se fund nervös un fonst noch wat

    Un hebbt den Kopp voll Rupen

     

    Denn plumpert se hier jeden Dag

    In uns all dreckig Mater

    Slank warrd fe as en Bohnenschach

    Un brunner es en Tater

     

    Un oct de Rupen in den Kopp

    De speelt nie mehr Theater

    De ganze Minsch, de leemt mer‘ op,

    Blut von dat brune Water

     

    Have you ever heard of Bramstedt?

    And from his brown mate?

    Every opinion has a fury,

    No Mater is probater.

     

    Men came here from the city,

    Because she could barely speak,

    She feels nervous and finds something else

    Un raises his head full of scars

     

    Because they plump here every day

    In us all dirty mater

    Slim warrd fe as en Bohnenschach

    Un brunner es en Tater

     

    Un oct de Rupen in den Kopp

    He never plays theater again

    The whole Man, the ‘me’,

    Blood from that brown water

    <<???>>

    << poem by A. Kühl>>

     

     

    Writing on the back:

    Uns Roland steiht un fieft und nockt.

    He seggt: De Welt de es verrückt.

    Ick mag hier nich mehr langer stahn ,

    Ick will man leewer runnergahn.

    Ick gah nah Beilenbarg nu aff,

    Dar lagg ick mi ganz still int Graff

    Un slaap bar, bet in Kopp un hart

    Die Min schheit ner ‘bernunftig ward.“

    >another quote by A. Kuhl<

    Uns Roland stands up five and nudges.

    He says: The world that drives it crazy.

    Ick may not stand here any longer,

    Ick want man leewer runnergahn.

    Ick gah nah Beilenbarg nu aff,

    Dar lag ick mi ganz still int Graff

    Un sleep bar, bet in Kopp un hart

    The mine is not “childish”.

    >another quote by A. Kühl <

    <<???>>

     

     

     

    <><><><><><><>

    50 pfg, Pentecost 1674, 07 Dec 1920

    Writing on the front:

    Solang de Wind weiht

    Un de Hahn kreiht

    Schall um’n Roland danzt warrn

    Wenn de Sünn ünnergeiht!

    As long as the wind blows

    And the rooster crows

    Sound around Roland dances were

    When the sun goes down!

    <<???>>

     

    De Bramstedter Buern danzt an’n drutten Pingsdag 1674 um den Roland, weil se ehr Freeheit kregen harrn. – Düt ward hüt to Dog nach mackt

    The peasants of Bramstedt danced around Roland on the third day of Pentecost 1674, because they were given their freedom. – Düt ward hüt to Dog nach mackt

    <<???>>

     

    Writing on the back:

    Notgeld von de holsteensche Stadt Bad Bramstedt

    Emergency money from the Holsteenian City of Bad Bramstedt

    <thinking Holstein is Germanic region>

     

     

     

     

    Dütz Schein, de gelt sien föfti Penn.

    Doch eenmal hett dat ock en Enn,

    denn kannst du lesen in uns Blatt:

    „De Schiens sünd all nu vör de Katt!“

    Denn bring em gau hen kah de Kass,

    Du bütz fünft an den Kossen fasz.

     

    Dütz Schein, de gelt sien föfti Penn.

    But once it has ock and Enn,

    because you can read in our sheet:

    “De Schiens sins now in front of the cat!”

    Denn bring em gau hen kah de Kass,

    You beat five on the pillows.

    >>???<<

     

    Thank you again,

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49982
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    You’re very welcome!

    Your translation of the caption is pretty much there : Wie man in Brakel früher die Diebe bestrafte can be rendered as “How we used to punish thieves in Brakel” (or “How they used to punish thieves in Brakel” or “How thieves used to be punished in Brakel”, using the passive voice;  the literal translation is “How one used to punish thieves in Brakel” but that’s a linguistic formulation in English that seems only to be popular with King Charles these days).

    Best wishes as always,

    John

    in reply to: Identification #49981
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
    Participant
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    Thanks John.

     

    Seems I missed a question though.  Hopefully I did not miss any more.

     

    Wie man in Brakel

    Früher die Diebe

    Bestrafte!

    (translated 08 January 2015)

    How to Brakel

    Previously, the thieves

    Punished!

    <<???>>

    Then again, the more I stare at this, the more more i wonder if this was meant be transcribed as a single line.  If so, with a few a couple grammatical changes, do I have translation already?

    in reply to: ADMISSION TICKETS GDR/DDR #49977
    Avatar photoMarcel Molkenboer
    Participant
    • Forum Brigadier
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    WILSNACK

    The wrapper keeps the complete serie (12 x 50 Pf) of the reprinted Serienscheine of 1921 with a new date of issue (1983). It is a souvenir of the 600 years city jubilee in 1983. (See the catalog below)

     

    (picture: Internet)

    in reply to: Identification #49974
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack, many thanks for your kind words!  Although I wasn’t quite around in the 1920s,  I do travel around Germany a bit and have been a bit of a Germanophile for over 40 years, and as I’ve been collecting Notgeld for nearly 20 years my passions seem to coalesce.

    The Brakel set is often regarded as anti-Semitic but I think a more nuanced interpretation would see that only one note – although that’s bad enough – is actually anti-Semitic, the 2-Mark note with the Jewish man chained to a pillory on the obverse.  It seems that because of this people often think that other pictures in the series must be anti-Semitic too.

    The victims of  brutal forms of justice on the back of the 50-pfennig note are not noticeably stereotypically Jewish, nor identified as such.  The theme is captioned as “How we used to punish thieves in Brakel” (Wie man in Brakel früher die Diebe bestrafte), and the malefactors being ducked and caned are “black marketeers, usurers and wastrels”. Obviously, there is the old libelous trope of Jews being automatically synonymous with usury since the Middle Ages (often the only business which they were legally allowed to engage in outside the ghettos).  But the victim of medieval dunking has neither the cartoon stereotypical features of a Jew (as does the figure in the pillory), nor is he wearing any clothing identifying him as such i.e. the gabardine coat of the pilloried Jew, or a conical or pointed hat, or a Star of David. I imagine that die-hard anti-Semites would have been triggered by the word usurer, but otherwise it’s a bit of a thin connection.

    Here’s the original and a translation :

    Solche Wippe, stark von Eisen, / Taucht man kurzer Hand ins Wasser. / Auch für heute wär sie praktisch / Für die Schieber, Wucherer, Prasser.

    Was der Einfalt nur erscheinet / Als ein Instrument zum Sitzen, Dieses wußten kluge Richter / Pädagogisch auszunützen.

    Such a ducking stool, made of strong iron, / Is ducked into the water in peremptory manner. / It would also be practical today / For black marketeers, usurers and wastrels.

    What might seem to a simple mind / An instrument on which to sit, / This the clever judges of yore / Knew how to use to teach a lesson.

    The 1-Mark note  with the image of St Anne’s Chapel on the obverse has a story about the chapel on the back, the story of Dat Mäken von Brakel (The Maiden of Brakel), taken from the Kinder und Hausmärchen (Children’s Fairy Tales and Fairy Tales for the Home) by the Brothers Grimm (1840) :

    Et gien mal ’n Mäken von Brakel na de Sünt Unnen Kappellen uner de Hinnenborg, un weil et gierne  ’n Mann heven wulte un ock meinde, et ware süs neimes in de Kappellen, sau sank et „O hilge Sünte Unne, help mie doch bald tom Manne. Du kennst ’n ja wull : He wuhnt vor’m Suttmerdore, hed gele Hore :Du kenns ’n ja wull.“ De Köster stand awerst hünner de Altare un höre dat, da rep he mit ’ner ganz schrögerigen Stimme : „Du kriggst ’n nig, du kriggst ’n nig.“  Da Mäken awerst meinde, dat Marienkinneken, dat bie de Mudder Anne steiht, hedde üm dat to ropen, da war et beuse un reip : „Pepperlepep, dumme Blae, halt de Schnuten un lat de Möhme kühren (die Mutter reden).“  

    [The bit in brackets at the end is the translation by the Brothers Grimm of the final phrase, which is so far removed from standard German ( the whole story is in Westphalian dialect) as to be otherwise unintelligible to outsiders.]

    In English : Once upon a time a maiden of Brakel was passing by the Chapel of Saint Anne beneath Hinnenburg Castle, and because she wanted dearly a husband and thought that there was no no one else in the chapel, she sang : “O holy Saint Anne, help me to get a man.  You know him well : he lives down by the Suttmer Gate, and has blond hair : you know him well.”  The verger however was standing behind the altar and heard that, whereupon he called out in a most croaky voice : “You’ll not have him, you’ll not have him.”  The girl thought however that the Child Mary, who stood next to Mother Anne, had called out to her, so she was angry and called back : “Stuff and nonsense, silly child, shut your face and let mother do the talking.”

    We can see in the picture the face of the naughty verger peeping out, red-nosed, from behind the altar of St Anne, depicting the grandmother of Christ and her child Mary the Mother of Christ, and calling to the pious girl who has even taken off her clogs as a gesture of respect before kneeling before the altar.

    The reverse side of the 2-Mark note tells a rather more earthy story :

    Ne beste Kamer harr’ wi nit, / Dorüm dat Jüngsten ut dat Finster schitt. / Jedoch – o weh – en Unglück gafst dorbi : / En Ratsmann gung akkrat vorbi, / De hätt dat Traktamente krumm genomen / Un is sin an den Kaak gekuomen. 

    Wahrhaftige Geschichte anno 1655

    We don’t have a lavatory, / So the youngest would shit out of the window. / But – oh woe – that was when an accident happened : / One of the town councillors was passing directly by, / And he took the entire allowance in the wrong way / And ended up in the cack.

    True story from the year 1655

    The word Traktamente stands in here for Exkremente, a s ahumorous bowdlerisation or malapropism.  Traktament was a word of Swedish origin (swathes of Northern Germany were overrun by the Swedes in the Thirty Years’ Way, including Brakel in 1646), it meant a financial allowance; I’ve tried to keep that sense in the translation.

    A final word on the anti-Semitic cartoon on the front of the 2-Mark note; in the issue catalogued G / M 150.1, the figure has exaggerated and stereotypical “Jewish” facial features, which were a staple of e.g. early 20th-century anti-Semitic postcards and later National Socialist publications such as Der Stürmer.  It may actually have been so offensive that it seems to have been softened on the later re-issues of the series, 150.2 and 150.3, where we see that buildings have been added and the outline of the figure’s face has been turned to be slightly less obvious.  Lindman notes in his catalogue, where the three series are numbered 142a, 142b and 142c : Bei b. und c. ist das Bild des 2-Mk-Scheines verändert (“With b and c, the picture of the 2-Mark note has been changed”).

    in reply to: Identification #49902
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    • ★★★★

     

    Greetings,

    Today we now review series 150.3 and 150.1

    The series of this town are again listed as anti semitic.  I am pretty sure these notes tell a story as well.  Given the theme, a troubling or insulting story would not surprise me.

     

    Golche Wippe, stark von Eisen,

    Taucht man kruger hand ins Wasser

    Auch für heute wär sie praktisch

    Für die Schieber, Wucherer, Prasser!

    (translated 08 January 2015)

    Golche rocker, hard of iron,

    If you dive kruger hand into the water

    Even today they would be practically

    For the slide, usurers, gluttons!

    <<???>>

     

    Was der Einfalt nur erscheinet

    Als ein Instrument zum Citzen

    Dieses wußten kluge Richter

    Bädagogisch auszunützen.

    (translated 08 January 2015)

    What the simplicity only appeareth

    As an instrument for Citzen

    This did wise judge

    Bädagogisch exploit.

    <<???>>

     

    Wie man in Brakel

    Früher die Diebe

    Bestrafte!

    (translated 08 January 2015)

    How to Brakel

    Previously, the thieves

    Punished!

    <<???>>

     

    Die Maken von Brakel.

    (translated 26 August 2020)

    The Maken of Brakel.

    <<???>>

     

    Et gien mal ‘n Maken von Brakel na de fünf Annen Kapellen uner de Hinnenborg, un weil et gierne ’n Mann heoen wulle  un ork meinde, et wäre sus neimes in de Kapellen, sau sank et „O hilge sunte Anne, help mie doch bald tom Manne.  Du kennst ‘n ja wull.“  De Hoster stand awerst hunner de Altare un hore dat, da rep he mit ‘ner gans schrogerigen Stimme: „Du kriggst ‘n nig, Du kriggst ‘n nig.“  Dat Maken awest meinde dat Marienkinnneken, dat bei derMudder Anne steiht hedde dat um to ropen, de war et beuse un reip: „Pepperlepep dumme Blae, halt de Schnuten un lat de Mohme kuhren (die Mutter reden).“

    (translated 26 August 2020)

    There was a maken from Brakel to the five Annen chapels under Hinnenborg, and because et gierne ‘n man heoen wulle un ork meinde, et would be sus neimes in the chapels, sau sank et “O hilge sunte Anne, help me soon tom Manne. You know ‘n ja wull. “De hoster stood awerst hunner de Altare un hore dat, da rep he with a goose scruffy voice:” You krigg’ n nig, you krigg ‘n nig. “Dat Maken awest meinde dat Marienkinnneken, dat with the Mudder Anne, hedde dat to ropen, de war et beuse un reip: “Pepperlepep stupid Blae, halt de Schnuten un lat de Mohme kuhren (the mother talk).”

    <<???>>

     

    Ne beste kamer harr’ wi nit.

    Dorüm dat Jüngsken ut dat finstrer schitt.

    Jedoch-o weh-en Unglück gafst’dorbi:

    En Ratsmanngung akfrat vorbi,

    De hätt dat traktamente frum genuomen:

    Un if sin an den Raaf gekuomen.

    (translated 08 January 2015)

    Ne best kamer harr ‘wi nit.

    Dorüm dat dat Jüngsken ut gloomy schitt.

    But-alas-en misfortune gafst’dorbi:

    En councilor Gung akfrat vorbi,

    De’d dat traktamente frum genuomen:

    Un sin if gekuomen to the Rav.

    <<???>>

     

    Once again I have to hope there can be more to these notes than hatred against Jews.  Though I accept the hatred of Jews had for the longest time to wide a public acceptance, I cannot help but hope that there is some redeemability to the message of these notes.  That hatred is not all there is.

     

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49901
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Thanks John,

    excluding some of the more evil subjects, I would almost accept as given that you were a) around to invent German notgeld, and b) spent enough time wandering German history taking notes on subject matter on the nearest convenient surface.

    You seem that aware of notgeld.

    :)

    Jacks

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #49874
    notgeldman
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    Thanks John – the piece has been posted to you. :good:

    in reply to: Identification #49814
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    the Bordelum notes are partly in High German and partly in  Nordergoesharder Friesisch, one of the ten surviving North Frisian dialects.  Fif-en-söbenti Pen. is, in High German : Fünfundsiebzig Pf. (75 pfennigs).  Pen. or P are abbrevaiations of the Frisian word Penning, where Pf. or Pfg. or common abbrevaitaions of the High German Pfennig.

    The motto Lewwer düad üs Slaav! (“Rather dead than a slave!”) is on a large number of notes from the Prussian province of Schleswig-Holstein (with a lot of variant dialect spellings).  It is connected to the tradition of the Friesische Freiheit, Frisian Freedom, the claim sunk in the mists of time that the peoples of Frisia were granted freedom of all lordship save that of the Emperor alone, as a reward for their warriors’ bravery in imperial service.  Frisian and Low German variants of the motto gained currency in Northern Frisia during the 1840s and in the aftermath of the Great War, particularly before, during and after the plebiscites of 1920 which decided the post-war fate of Northern Schleswig. There is a classical pedigree to the phrase, in Cicero’s mors mihi est servitude potior.

    Hope this helps!  Best wishes as always.

    in reply to: Identification #49813
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings,

     

    Now we look at Bordelum, series 143.

     

    Fif en sobenti Pen.
    (translated 22 August 2020)
    Fif en sobenti Pen.
    <<???>>

     

     

    Lewwer düad üs slaav!

    (translated 22 August 2020)

    Lewwer düad üs slaav!

    <<???>>

     

    Possibly a regional dialect??

     

    thanks for all help.

     

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49812
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Thanks,

    It was helpful and incredibly informative.

    It is sad situation that symbol that was respectable so long over so much of the world is now tainted.  Though Hindus and some other faiths still are able to see the original meaning in the swastika, the Nazi’s have ruined it for a greater portion of the planet.

     

    What once meant ‘sun’ or ‘good fortune’. now represents some of worst fortunes of the twentieth century.

     

    Will submit the next one soon.

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49794
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The verses on the reverse of the notes seem to come from three sources.

    The ones on the Wohldenberg hunting note (25 Pf. #1),  the Bodensteiner Klippen note (50 Pf. #2) and the castle ruins note (75 Pf. #1) seem to be by a local poet (going by the references to the Ambergau, which is very small and not renowned in German literature) and strike a pseudo-Romantic note.

    The ones on the church note (25 Pf. #2), the townscape note (50 Pf. #1) and the dean’s house note (50 Pf. # 3) are anti-Semitic and seem to derive from a far-right nationalist source, perhaps a newspaper , periodical or flyer;  putting them together is interesting as the metre is similar and they may well be the work of one author.  NB the “dwarven horde”, with its baleful power of gold to corrupt the warriors, is likely racialist code for Jews corrupting Aryans; the word Aryan itself is from an Indo-European root meaning “warrior”.

    I think that the verse on the Merian engraving note (75 Pf. #3) likely belongs to this latter group, with its dark mumblings about German tribal lands and the phobic eye-rolling about the worm gnawing on the (German) oak and weakening it for destruction in the next storm.

    I can identify the verses on the 1-Mark notes exactly.   The  notes are devoted to the humorist and poet Wilhelm Busch (1832-1908) : one has his portrait and one has his grave at Mechtshausen near Bockenem (Grabstätte Wilhelm Buschs in Mechtshausen bei Bockenem).  The obverse of the first has two quotations from his works, from Die Fromme Helene (Pious Helene), one of his anti-clerical satires, the other from Julchen (Little Julia), the third work of his Knopp Trilogy.  The second note has in its entirety the poem Mein Lebenslauf (The Course My Life Has Run), written on the occasion of his 75th – and final – birthday.

    You’ve inspired me to dig a little deeper in my researches and I found a reference in an old newspaper with some interesting news!

    It seems that Herr Rehmann, the anti-semitic National Socialist publisher of the notes,  attracted the notice of the authorities with his propaganda.  The Social Democrat Newspaper Die Volksstimme (The People’s Voice), based in Magdeburg, reported on Saturday 19th August under the headline “German Nationalist Notgeld” : Recently we have been informed that in a town in Hannover Notgeld has been circulated to the values of 25, 50 and 75 Pfennigs, which not only feature the swastika but also show verses, such as : The free German man became a serf, / The Jew counterfeits German law /And passes it on to his heirs. As the Swabian Daily Sentinel (Schwäbische Tagwacht) reports, even in Württemberg propaganda has been made with these Notgeld notes, which is indicated by the discovery of an entire bundle of such notes in a forest near Stuttgart.  On this paper money it is written that : “This note can can be redeemed in my premises until 31. 12. 1923. Heinr. Rehmann, Book Printing, Bockenem.” As the official “Prussian Press Agency” has heard from the appropriate authorities, a criminal charge has been made against the publisher of these Notgeld notes, Herr Rehmann in Bockenem, by the State Prosecutor in Hildesheim.                                                 

    What I find interesting here – apart from Herr Rehmann getting his come-uppance – is that the notes were clearly being used in a far-right propaganda campaign to spread the perverted gospel of anti-Semitism across the Republic, over a year before the Nazis’ attempted coup in Munich in November 1923.  A whole bundle of them found in a forest in far-away Swabia seems to indicate the widespread intended covert use of Notgeld as a political tool.

    Hope that this helps to answer your question, and adds a bit of extra interest for frequenters of the forum.

    Very best wishes in your job search.  I hope that you find something fitting and fulfilling very soon.

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #49782
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    Greetings John,

    Rather helpful you are.

    As I am under employed and job searching, I find myself with quite a lot of notgeld time.  This might distract me a bit from the depressing situation.

     

    On the last set, only question thus far… are all the verses on the various notes part of a single literary work?

     

    Jack

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #49762
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Tony, what a lovely note.  It would probably be classed as a Spendenschein as it give thanks for the Spende (donation) of 5 Kronen to assist the work of Perchtoldsdorf’s Healthcare at Home organisation (Hauskrankenpflege).

    It seems to show Christ at the healing / restoring to life of Jairus’ daughter, and the verse is entirely Christian in tone and content.

    I’ve translated it as accurately as possible while retaining the sense of verse :

    A star has arisen
    In a blue-tinged night
    It has brought wholeness
    To all those who live in fear
    Caused by suffering.

    Its eye blinks sweetly
    At the sick and the weary
    And gives peace and consolation :
    O Lord, you are love indeed.

    And if from out of this heart
    A sun ray lights up yours,
    Then you will feel another’s pain
    And weep with them who weep.
    Then light shall fall upon you,
    To see, in pain’s dark night,
    The star under which we live :
    God. – Charity.- The pow’r of love.

     

     

     

    in reply to: Identification #49761
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Oops!  Formatting issues in previous post! Apologies.  Will try to sort out :)

    in reply to: Identification #49760
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    Hope that all is well.  The Bockenem series is indeed anti-Semitic, as it was issued by the local printer and publisher Heinrich Rehmann, an ardent National Socialist who printed at his own cost Bernhard Rust’s Nazi newspaper, the weekly Niedersächsischer Beobachter (Lower Saxony Observer), re-established in 1925 after the ban on the NSDAP was lifted (source : Detlef Mühlberger’s Hitler’s Voice, 2004).

    Ambergau was a small, county-sized region of the Prussian province of Hannover, centred on the town of Bockenem.  It was a historic rather than administrational designation.  Each note bears the coat of arms of Bockenem, with the colours of the Diocese of Hildesheim, upon which there is a heraldic Turnierkragen, or in the English language of heraldry a label of seven points argent of the counts of Wohldenberg who first granted the town its charter.  And yes, it looks like a comb or a saw.  But isn’t.

    Each of the ten very colourful notes has different verses on the front and different pictures on the back, and the series would be delightful except for the underlying toxic creed of racial hatred which comes to the fore on a number of occasions.

    I’ve tidied up the translations a bit, clarified some queries and put them in the order that Lindman and Grabowski / Mehl have the notes in their catalogues.  Hope that this is useful.

    25 Pfennig # 1 :

    Von stolzer Höhe Burgruinen ragen,
    Uns Kunde gebend aus der Vorzeit Grau,
    Von blut’gen Fehden die dort einst geschlagen,
    Von Rittern, die geherrscht im Ambergau.

    (From proud heights castle ruins rise,                                                                                                                                                                                                                    To tell us tales from times of misty past,                                                                                                                                                                                                                Of bloody feuds that once were fought there,                                                                                                                                                                                                        Of knights who ruled in Ambergau.)

    Auf reichen Fluren goldne Saaten sprießen,
    Ein Flüßchen windet sich durch blum’ge Au,
    Und aus den Tälern Städt’ u. Dörfer grüßen,
    Gott schütze immer dich, mein Ambergau.

    (Upon rich meadows golden seeds do sprout,                                                                                                                                                                                                     A little river winds its way through flowery fields,                                                                                                                                                                                            And towns and villages greet one from the valleys,                                                                                                                                                                                       God protect you ever, my Ambergau.)

    25 Pfennig # 2 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Der freie Deutsche ward zum Knecht,
    Der Jude fälscht das deutsche Recht
    Und gibt es seinen Erben.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Der Bauer flieht von Hof und Haus,
    Sucht über’m Meer die Stätte aus
    Zum Sterben.

    (The free German man became a serf,                                                                                                                                                                                                              The Jew counterfeits German law                                                                                                                                                                                                                     And passes it on to his heirs.
    The farmer flees from farmstead and home,                                                                                                                                                                                                        Seeks across the sea the place                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Where he will die.)

    50 Pfennig # 1 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Es haust im Land der Zwerge Schar,
    Die Niflheims schwarze Nacht gebar.  –
    Der Ring der Nibelungen
    Hat durch des schnöden Goldes Macht
    Die Sieger aus der Reckenschlacht                                                                                                                                                                                                            Bezwungen.

    (In this land lives the dwarven horde,                                                                                                                                                                                                              Who birthed the dark night of Niflheim. –                                                                                                                                                                                                      The Ring of the Nibelungs,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    By the power of filthy lucre,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Has conquered the victors of                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The warriors’ battle.)

    50 Pfennig # 2 (NB this is not two verses but one longer verse running from left to right)

    Hoch oben die ragenden Klippen
    So ernst und grau und alt,
    Am Abhang Büsche und Haide                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Ringsum der grünende Wald.
    Und mitten in blühender Wildnis                                                                                                                                                                                                             Umblüht von der rotbraunen Heid’
    Ein Reh mit leuchtenden Augen,
    Ein Reh – oder ist’s eine Maid?
    Ich habe sie oft gesehen
    Und meinte, ich kennte sie,
    Die Klippen und all ihre Schöne:
    So schön sah ich sie nie.

    (High above the towering cliffs                                                                                                                                                                                                                             So grave and grey and old,                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Upon the slope bushes and scrubland                                                                                                                                                                                                       Surrounded by the verdant forest.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   And in the middle of this flowering wasteland                                                                                                                                                                                                 In the midst of the blooming russet heath                                                                                                                                                                                                           A deer with sparkling eyes,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     A deer – or is it a maiden?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       I have seen them oftentimes                                                                                                                                                                                                                              And thought that I did know them,                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The cliffs and all their beauty : –
    I have never seen them so beautiful.)

    50 Pfennig # 3 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Statt Königsmacht herrscht Judengold
    Die Kunst ist fein;
    Im Judensold
    Muß sich der Edle bücken. –
    Der Jude frech, der Deutsch bleich,
    Zerbrich, du schönes Deutsches Reich
    In Stücken!

    (Instead of royal power it is Jewish gold that reigns,                                                                                                                                                                                    Such arts are slyly clever;                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The noble man must bow and scrape                                                                                                                                                                                                             Once in the service of the Jew.                                                                                                                                                                                                                          The Jew is insolent,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               The German pale,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     O break, ye beautiful German Reich                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Into pieces!)

    75 Pfennig # 1 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Du lieblich Land,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        in deines Reichtum’s Fülle
    Umrahmt von Bergen rings,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                wohin ich schau
    Wie weihevoll ist deiner Wälder Stille,
    Du teures Heimatland, mein Ambergau.

    (You lovely land,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       In the fullness of your riches                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Surrounded by by mountains all around,                                                                                                                                                                                                             Where e’er I look                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 How holy is the stillness of your forests,                                                                                                                                                                                                            You dear country, my Ambergau.)

    75 Pfennig # 2 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Wach auf, du alter Kampfesmut,
    Germanenblut,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Berserkerwut
    Zum Letzten will ich werben.
    Wer nicht als Sklave leben mag.
    Dann winkt der große Rachetag
    Zum Sterben.

    Awake, you old fighting spirit,                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Germanic blood,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Berserker’s rage                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    That I want to proclaim to the end.                                                                                                                                                                                                                     To him who would not live as a slave                                                                                                                                                                                                                The great day of vengeance thus beckons                                                                                                                                                                                                          To his death.)

    75 Pfennig # 3 (NB this is not two verses but one verse running from left to right)

    Rings tiefe Nacht auf deutschen Gau’n,
    Am Firmament kein Stern zu schau’n,
    Das Dunkel zu erhellen;                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Am Stamm der Eiche nagt der Wurm,
    Sie wankt, es kann der nächste Sturm Sie fallen!

    (All around the deepest night upon German tribal lands                                                                                                                                                                                In the sky no star to be seen                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  To light the darkness;
    On the trunk of the oak the worm does gnaw,
    It shakes, the next storm can fell it!)

    1 Mark # 1

    Das Gute – dieser Satz steht fest
    Ist stets das Böse, was man läßt!
    (Goodness – the principle is unassailable –                                                                                                                                                                                                   Consists of the evil from which one refrains!)

    Eins zwei drei! im Sauseschritt                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Läuft die Zeit,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        wir laufen mit. –
    (One two three! Time doth fly,                                                                                                                                                                                                                           And we walk alongside. -)

    1 Mark # 2

    Mein Lebenslauf ist bald erzählt. – In stiller Ewigkeit verloren schlief ich, und nichts hat mir gefehlt, bis daß ich sichtbar ward geboren.
    Was aber nun? – Auf schwachen Krücken, ein leichtes Bündel auf dem Rücken bin ich getrost dahin geholpert, bin über manchen Stein gestolpert mitunter grad, mitunter krumm, und schließlich mußt ich mich verschnaufen; bedenklich rieb ich meine Glatze und sah mich in der Gegend um.
    Ohweh! Ich war im Kreis gelaufen, stand wiederum am alten Platze, und vor mir dehnt sich lang und breit wie ehedem, die Ewigkeit.
    Wilhelm Busch
    (My life’s journey is soon told. – I slept, lost, in silent eternity, and lacked nothing until I was apparently born.                                                                            But what now? – On feeble crutches, a light bundle upon my back, I hobbled happily hence, stumbled over many a stone, walked sometimes tall and sometimes hunched over, until finally I had to pause for breath;  in a state of apprehension and doubt I rubbed my hand across my balding head and looked around the place that I had ended up.                                                                                                                                                                                                     O woe!  I had gone around in a circle, stood in the same old place, and before me stretches, broad and long as before, eternity.                                        Wilhelm Busch                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        March 1907)

    Using the text given, the reverse sides show :

    25 Pf. # 1 : Wohldenberg (Jagdzug) : [Castle of] Wohldenberg (Hunting Party)

    25 Pf. # 2 : Kirche St Pankratii : Church of St Pancras

    50 Pf. # 1 : Stadt Bockenem :  Town of Bockenem

    50 Pf. # 2 : Bodensteiner Klippen : the cliffs at Bodenstein

    50 Pf. # 3 : Superintendentur. Quartier des Feldherrn Tilly am Tage vor der Schlacht a. Barenberge : Dean’s House.  General Tilly’s quarters on the day before the Battle of [Lutter on] the Barenberge

    75 Pf. # 1 : Wohldenberg (Ruine und Aussichtsturm) : Wohldenberg (ruins and watchtower)

    75 Pf. # 2 : Stättlein Borelem im Stift Hildesheim · Nach Merian aus dem Jahre 1651 : Little town of Borelem [abberrant spelling of Bockenem on the original Merian engraving] in the Diocese of Hildesheim, according to Merian in the year 1651

    1 Mark # 1 : Wilhelm Busch

    1 Mark # 2 : Grabstätte Wilhelm Buschs in Mechtshausen bei Bockenem : Grave of Wilhelm Busch in Mechtshausen near Bockenem

    in reply to: Identification #49747
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
    Participant
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    Greetings,
    The town today is Bockenem. The group is supposedly antisemetic. Perhaps better translations will help me to fully understand why. I have often said money has a message for those holding it. This a series of Notgeld whose message society could have done without.

    On all notes:

    Ambergau notgeld
    (translated 04 January 2015)
    Ambergau emergency money

    Ambergau???

    25 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 046268
    Writing on the back:
    Don stolzer höhe Bergruinen ragen,
    Uns Kunde gebend aus der Vorzeit Grau,
    Von blut’gen Fehden die dorf einst geschlagen,
    Von Rittern, die geherrscht im Ambergau
    (translated 04 January 2015)
    Don proud altitude mountain ruins stand,
    About Us Customer crucial from the past Grey,
    Bloody feuds of the village once beaten,
    From knights who ruled in Ambergau
    <<???>>

    Auf reichen Fluren goldne Saafen sprießen,
    Ein Flüßchen windet sich durch blum’ge Au,
    Und aus den Iälern Stadt’ u. Dörfer grüßen,
    Gott schütze immer dich, mein Ambergau.
    (translated 04 January 2015)
    In rich golden corridors Saafen sprout,
    A creek winds through blum’ge Au,
    And from the Iälern city ‘u. Villages greet
    God always bless you, my Ambergau.
    <<???>>

    25 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 016337
    Writing on the front:
    Der freie Deutsche ward zum Knecht,
    Der Jude fälscht das deutsche Recht
    Und gibt es feinen Erben.
    (translated 05 January 2015)
    The free German became a servant,
    The Jew fakes the German law
    And there are fine heirs.
    <not sure about last line>
    <<???>>

    Der Bauer flieht von hof und haus,
    Sucht über’m Meer die Stätte aus
    Zum Sterben.
    (translated 05 January 2015)
    The farmer will flee from yard and house,
    Addiction across the sea from the site
    To die for.
    <<???>>

    50 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 036124
    Writing on the back:
    Stadtt Königsmacht herricht Judengold
    Die Kunst ist fein;
    Im Judensold
    Muß sich der Edle bücken
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    Town T royal power mr ot Jews Gold
    The art is fine;
    The Jews Sold
    Has to stoop of the Noble
    <<???>>

    Der Jude frech, der Deutsch bleich,
    Zerbrich, du schönes Deutsches Reich
    In Stücken!
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    The Jew naughty, the German pale,
    Break, you beautiful German Empire
    In pieces!
    <<???>>>

    50 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 076873
    Writing on the back:
    Hoch oben die ragenden Klippen
    So ernst und grau und alt,
    Am Abhang Büsche und haide Ringsum grünende Wald.
    Und mitten in blühender Wildnis Amblüht von der rotbraunen Heid’
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    High above the towering cliffs
    So seriously and gray and old,
    On the slope bushes and haide Round verdant forest.
    And in the middle of blooming wild amblüht of the red-brown heath
    <<???>>

    Ein Reh mit leuchtenden Augen,
    Ein Reh – oder ist’s eine Maid?
    Ich habe sie ost gesehen
    Und meinte, ich kennte sie,
    Die Klippen und all ihre Schöne:
    So schön sah ich sie nie.
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    A deer with bright eyes,
    A deer – or is it a maid?
    I have seen them east
    And said that if I knew it,
    The cliffs and all its beauty:
    So beautiful I never saw it.
    <<???>>

    50 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 006952
    Writing on the back:
    Es haust im Land ber Zwerge Schar,
    Die Niflheims schwarze Nacht gebar –
    Der Ring der Nibelungen
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    It lives in the country over Gnomes multitude,
    The Niflheim black night gave birth –
    The Ring of the Nibelungs
    <<???>>

    Hat durch des schnöden Goldes Macht
    Die Sieger aus der Reckenschlacht Bezwungen.
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    Has the power filthy gold
    The winner of the drawing battle defeated.
    <<???>>

    75 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 056524
    Writing on the front:
    Stättlein Borelem im Stift Hildesheim
    Nach Merian aus dem Jahre 1651.
    (translated 04 January 2015)
    Stättlein Borelem in pen Hildesheim
    After Merian from the year 1651st
    <<???>>

    Writing on the back:
    Rings tiefe Nacht auf deutschen Gau’n,
    Am Firmament kein Stern zu schau’n,
    Das Dunkel zu er hellen;
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    Ring deep night on German Gau’n,
    The firmament no rating for schau’n,
    The darkness light to it;
    <<???>>

    Am Stamm der Eiche nagt der Wurm,
    Sie wankt, es kann der nächste Sturm Sie fallen!
    (translated 06 January 2015)
    On the trunk of the oak gnawing worm,
    She shakes it, the next storm, you fall!
    <<???>>

    75 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 066234
    Writing on the back:
    Du lieblich Land, in deines, Reichtum’s Fülle
    Amrahmt von Bergen rings, wohin ich schau
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    You lovely country, in your Wealth’s wealth
    Surrounded by mountains around wherever I look
    <<???>>

    Wie weihevoll ist deiner Wälder Stille,
    Du teures Heimatland, mein Ambergau.
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    How is your solemn silence forests,
    You expensive home country, my Ambergau.
    <<???>>

    75 pfennig, 31 December 1923, 086982
    Writing on the back:
    Wach auf, du alter Kampfesmut,
    Germanenblut, Berserkerwut
    Zum Letzten will ich werben.
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    Wake up, you old fighting spirit,
    German blood, Berserker
    To the last, I want to advertise.
    <<???>>

    Wer nicht als Sklave leben mag.
    Dann winkt der große Rachetag
    Zum Sterben.
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    Who does not like to live as a slave.
    Then beckons the great vengeance Day
    To die for.
    <<???>>

    01 Mark, 31 December 1923, 096727
    Writing on the back:

    Das Gute – dieser Satz steht fest
    Ist stets das Böse, was man läßt!
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    The good – this sentence is clear
    Is always evil, what you can!
    <<???>>

    Eins zwei drei! Im Sauseschritt Läuft die Zeit, wir laufen mit.
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    One two three! In Sauseschritt If the time, we run with.
    <<???>>

    01 Mark, 31 December 1923, 026660

    Writing on the back:
    Mein Lebenslauf ist bald erzählt. – in stiller Ewigkeit verloren schlief ich, und nichts hat mir gefehlt, bis daß ich sichtbar ward geboren.
    Was aber nun? – Auf schwachen Krücken, ein leichtes Bündel auf dem Rücken bin ich geirost dahin geholpert, bin über manchen Stein gestolpert mitunter grad, mitunter krumm, und schließlich mußt ich mich verschnaufen; bedenklich reib ich meine Glaße und sah mich in der Gegend um.
    Ohweh! Ich war im kreis gelaufen, stand wiedurum am alten Platze, und vor mir dehnt sich lang und breit wie ehedem, die Ewigkeit.
    Wilhelm Busch
    März 1907
    (translated 07 January 2015)
    My resume is soon told. – Lost in silent eternity I slept, and nothing was missing, was born until I was visible.
    But what now? – On weak crutches, a light bundle on his back I’m geirost geholpert meaning’m some stone sometimes stumbled degree, sometimes crooked, and finally I’ve got to catch me; I rub my concern glass and looked around the area.
    Ohweh! I was running in circles, wiedurum stood at the old place, and before me stretches long and wide as ever, eternity.
    Wilhelm Busch
    March 1907
    <<???>>

    Thanks,
    Jack

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #49718
    notgeldman
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    I just received this Austrian notgeld for 5 Kronen, issued in Perchtoldsdorf. It is described as a ‘Schatzschein’ (Treasury note). You don’t see it that often so I thought I should post it here. if the verse on the top of the obverse is interesting, can someone translate it please? – No rush!!…..

    in reply to: Identification #49713
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    Hi Jack,

    The Harz is a lovely region of Germany which I’ve enjoyed visiting on a couple of occasions.  The mountains are packed with fir trees on the surface – which is why we see the fir tree on the obverse of the 5 Pf. and 25 Pf, notes – and with ore below the surface, hence the old Harz folk song, the first lines of which are on all the notes in the set : Es grüne die Tanne, / Es wachse das Erz – / Gott schenk uns allen / Ein fröhliches Herz (“Let the pine tree stay green, let the ore grow in the earth, / May God give us all a cheerful heart”).  You can hear a nice male-choir version on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kB5nlUgPXeo.

    “Gegen diesen Gutschein zahlen umstehende Firmen an den Überbringer“ means “The firms listed overleaf will pay the bearer for this voucher“. On the back of the note are fourteen guarantors of the note, including a newspaper (the Blankenburger Kreisblatt), two banks and three hotels, which also gives us an idea of where these collectors’ editions, these Serienscheine, could be purchased locally.

    The figure on the 10 Pf. and 25 Pf. notes is a Wild Man, a stock character of local legend, a giant wearing a loin cloth and cap of foliage, armed with an entire pine tree ripped out at the roots.  One story tells of the capture of such a woodwose by miners who took him to the Duke of Brunswick, only to have their captive die of wounds on the way; they buried him at a place which is now the Goslar suburb of Wildemann.

    On the reverse is a witch on a broomstick.  The Harz is rife with witch stories, especially as a result of Goethe’s famous Witches’ Sabbat on the Brocken Mountain in the greatest work of German drama, Faust. The people of the Harz are so witch-obsessed that every motorway sign in the region which points out local towns and attractions has the figure of a witch flying above.  You can go to the Witches’ Dance Floor, a tourist site with a children’s playground and petting zoo, via cable car above the town of Thale, to find a statue of the Devil and a demon and a rather naked witch.  Um.  It truly is Witch Country up there in the Harz.  Everywhere you go, you can buy plush witches, witch dolls, witch postcards, witch schnapps, etc etc. It’s like a year-round Halloween up there.

    You can find the motif of the fir tree, any number of witches and the Wild Man on lots of notes from a number of towns in the Harz region.

    Hope that this helps.

    Best wishes as always,

    John

     

    in reply to: Identification #49709
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
    Participant
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    Greetings,

     

    Now we look at Blankenburg am Harz.  Series 113.1 to be precise.  This is a nice group to see how the locals viewed some of the places within their area.  Also, this is the first time I recal seeing a note reading ‘Bills in which the number is completely or partially missing will not be redeemed.’.

     

     

    05 pfg, Rathaus, 15 Okt 1920, # 78536

    (same text it seems on the fronts of all notes in the series)

    Writing on the front:

    Es grüne die Tanne es wachse das Erz,

    Gott schenke uns allen ein fröhliches herz

    (translated 17 August 2020)

    The fir tree grows green, the ore grows,

    God give us all a happy heart

    >>>use of ore questionable<<<

     

    Gegen diesen Zahlen umstehende Firmen

    an den Überbringer

    (translated 17 August 2020)

    Companies around against these numbers

    to the deliverer

    <<???>>

    <not sure I follow the translation>

     

     

     

    10 pfg, Burg Regenstein Teilanscicht, 15 Okt 1920, # 120649

    (same on the 50 pfg note)

    Thoughts on the front image:

     

    Seems to be some kind of unknown figure I have not figured out…

    …figure is the same on front and back…

     

    The other notes have a tree.  For some reason I am getting an idea of the Christmas truce…

     

    Thanks for your thoughts on this.

     

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49708
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
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    John,

     

    It did indeed.  I was never good at them, so I must be excessively grateful that Tony made a page for them.

    Thank you to you both for the work put into that entry.

     

    Jack

    in reply to: Identification #49707
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
    Participant
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    Hi Jack,

    and a Happy New Year to you.  Glad to hear that the Bielefeld information has been helpful.

    With regard to the images on the Bielefeld 103.5a series, they aren’t house marks but rebuses.  I deciphered, translated and commented on them all for Tony some time ago, and he’s kept the information in an article on the site. It’s under Categories > Serienscheine > Specific towns > towns (A-L) > * Bielefeld RUEBCHEN, and is available for viewing, like the Forum, to all good GNCC members like yourself.

    Hope this helps!

    Happy collecting in 2024 and best wishes as always,

    John

     

    in reply to: Identification #49706
    Avatar photoJack Sutton
    Participant
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    Bielefeld 103.5a

     

    First, thanks for all the help on this town this far.  The concept of House Marks and how the evolved into personal signatures was fascinating.

     

    along those lines, could the images in the circled insets in this group also be house marks?

     

    thanks, Jack

     

    in reply to: Identification #49631
    notgeldman
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    Good spot John!

    Thanks for clarifying. Only you would have known so all’s well that ends well! :good:

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #49630
    notgeldman
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    Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year to everyone for 2024

    in reply to: Identification #49624
    Avatar photoJohn Adams
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    ERRATUM : Edit to post about Bielefeld 5 Mark piece, 1st November 1918

    Dear Jack, dear all,

    apologies for the error in my post on the aforementioned.   In the third from last paragraph, I asserted that “on the reverse, the text on the left side feeds into the text on the right side : “Redeemable at all public finance offices in Bielefeld and finance offices in Westphalia, in both town and country”.  It is in fact “Redeemable at all public finance offices in Bielefeld and Halle, in both town and country” (Einlösung erfolgt durch alle öffentlichen Kassen in Bielefeld und Halle, Stadt und Land).  I misread the word Halle, thinking the letter H to be a K, the letters l to be upright letters s and the curlicue on the final e as an n, thus : Kassen.  With the disadvantages of neither being German nor over the age of 90, I’m not a fluent writer or reader of the Kurrent and Sütterlin scripts.

    Halle refers here not to the large city in Saxony, Halle on the Saale, but to the rather more modest Westphalian district of Halle (Kreis Halle) which existed from 1816 until 1972, when it was incorporated into the Kreis of Gütersloh (which also permanently borrowed parts of Bielefeld).

    I noticed this error when I was working on another Bielefeld note, the 1-Mark piece from 15th May 1921, where the terms for redemption specifically include Kreis Halle, in a very legible Roman script : Eingelöst werden diese Platzanweisungen bei allen städtischen Kassen in Bielefeld und im Kreise Halle i. W.  

    Once again, apologies for any confusion … and a Happy New Year!

    in reply to: general notgeld chit-chat #49598
    Avatar photoMarcel Molkenboer
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    Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to all !!!!!

     

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